-->
-->

Kandovan village-Kandowan Village-Candovan

Helpful information about famous villages in Iran like name, introduction, maps, requirements and...

Kandovan village-Kandowan Village-Candovan

Postby Mehdi » Tue Aug 06, 2013 5:41 am

Introduction: Kandovan (also spelled Candovan) (Persian: کندوان) is a tourist village in the province of East Azarbaijan, near Osku and Tabriz, Iran. Its fame is due to its troglodyte dwellings. Some of the houses are at least 700 years old and are still inhabited. Kandovan is also known for its scenic beauty. A popular resort, it offers hotels and restaurants to serve tourists. Its mineral water is also popular with visitors and is believed to be a cure for kidney disease.



-------------------------------------------------


Location: Near the city of Tabriz in East Azar Bayjan Province.



Days of trip: (Without air plane) 2-3 Days from Tehran to Tehran (Without heavy traffic you need About 10-12 hr driving from Tehran to "Kandoban" village)
Attention: In holidays there is heavy traffic in all roads around Tehran.

Best time to visit: May to October

Daily time visit: No limit

Difficulty level: Easy

Requirements: (Depend on your plan) Guide or GPS track, water, food, warm and waterproof clothes and tent, waterproof shoes, headlamp

Legal permission need: No


-------------------------------------------------


Overall risk: -

Animal risk:No

Lost risk: No

Rescue: Yes, you can call 115

GSM Mobile Antenna: Yes


-------------------------------------------------


Hotel: Yes

Shop: Yes

Gasoline: No


-------------------------------------------------


How to get there:
1- Go to Baihaghi or Wast terminal of buses in Tehran (more info)
2- Take a bus ticket to Tabriz.(Distance between Tehran to Tabriz is 620 Km)
3- Take a taxi from Tabriz to Kandoban village


Nearest airport: Tabriz airport

Nearest train station: Tabriz station


-------------------------------------------------


Location on map:




Pictures:
Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image



More Pictures:
http://www.anobanini.net/forum/showthread.php?3157
User avatar
Mehdi
Site Admin
 
Posts: 231
Joined: Sun Aug 04, 2013 10:13 am
Has thanked: 25 times
Been thanked: 12 times

Re: Kandovan village

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Dec 15, 2013 4:37 am

Iran's Kandovan with its many geographical and natural features is one of the most magnificent tourist attractions in the world.

The village which dates back to the time of the Mongol invasion, is located approximately 60 kilometers southwest of the city of Tabriz, adorning the northern slopes of a valley at the foothills of Mount Sahand.

The name Kandovan comes from the old term "Kandou jan". "Kand" meaning village and "Jan" meaning existence.

Kandovan's exceptional beauty lies in its fabulous 3000 year-old rocky settlements, which are carved into the mountain and are reminders of Sahand's volcanic eruptions from the early tertiary period to the early quaternary period.

Eroded by flowing waters, the stones have turned into cones. The troglodyte homes, carved into the rocks usually have two, three or four floors.

The first floor is used as a stable, the second and third floors as living areas and the fourth floor as a warehouse.

Windows are decorated with colorful glass and entrances are made of one single piece of rock, no more than 160cm high.

Most houses face southward so their inhabitants can enjoy sunlight during the day. They are cool in the summer and warm in the winter.

People in Kandovan mostly live on their income from selling dairy products, meat, wool, honey, handcrafts and dried vegetables.

A river flowing down Sahand peaks passes through the valley, creating a number of natural springs. These mineral water sources were traditionally used to treat various ailments.

Remains of similar rocky architecture can be found in Italy, Afghanistan, Greece, Peru, Latin America and China, but Kandovan is a rare example as it still serves as a human settlement.

A living example of human adaptation to exceptionally unusual natural surroundings, the scenic beauty of Kandovan attracts some 300,000 tourists every year.

Kandovan's five-star cliff hotel is the third of its kind in the world.

Source:iranreview

Image

Image
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: Kandovan village

Postby Parvaneh » Thu Jan 30, 2014 12:57 pm

Kandovan is a tourist village near Osku and Tabriz, located on the steep mountain flank of Sabalan, northwest of Iran, 60 kilometers away from Tabriz. Some say it gets its name from the plural of “kandoo” which means beehive. Others explain that the name Kandovan comes from the old term "Kandou jan"; "Kand" meaning village and "Jan" meaning life. Its fame is due to its special houses which are carved inside rocks. Some of the houses are at least 700 years old and are still being inhabited. Other estimates dates this village back 3,000 years. At last count, Kandovan was home to 670 people whose main occupations are agriculture and animal raising; selling dairy products, meat, wool, honey, handcrafts and dried vegetables.


A river flowing down Sahand peaks passes through the valley, creating a number of natural springs. Its mineral water is also popular by visitors and was traditionally used to treat various ailments including for liver and kidney diseases.


The extraordinary form of the rocks was formed as a result of Sahand's volcanic eruptions from the early tertiary period to the early quaternary period. Eroded by flowing waters, the stones have turned into cones.


Legend has it that the first inhabitants of Kandovan moved there to escape from the invading Mongols, They dug hideouts in the volcanic rock and ultimately ended up transforming them into permanent houses. The troglodyte homes, carved into the rocks have between two, three or four floors. The ground floor is used as a stable, the second and third floors as living areas and the fourth floor as a warehouse. Most houses face southward so their inhabitants can enjoy sunlight during the day. The troglodyte homes have the reputation of being very energy efficient, remaining cool in summer and warm in winter. The cave homes require minimal supplemental heat during the long cold season, making for comfortable year round habitation.


Kandovan also has scenic beauty. It is now one of Iran’s most popular tourist destinations and the rock-houses rival the famous Cappadocia Hotel. It’s a popular resort and there are hotels and restaurants there to serve tourists. Laleh Kandovan Hotel, the first cliff hotel in the country and a five-star hotel in its own right, opened in 2007.

http://historicaliran.blogspot.com/2009 ... llage.html

[img][img]http://cdn.tabnak.ir/files/fa/news/1391/4/17/171325_310.jpg[/img][/img]

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: Kandovan village

Postby Parvaneh » Wed Feb 05, 2014 2:49 pm

Kandovan is an ancient village tucked away in the northwest corner of Iran at the foothills of Mount Sahand and near the city of Tabriz. The historical village of Kandovan is one of the three rocky villages of the world. Houses in this village look like beehives built in the heart of mountains.

There are two other rocky villages in the world, one in North Dakota in the US and the other in Turkey. However, Kandovan, situated in Oskou District, is the only rocky village of the world inhabited by people for some 6,000 years.

A living example of human adaptation to exceptionally unusual natural surroundings, Kandovan village is located 50 km to the south of Tabriz, Osku, on the northern slopes of a valley at the foothills of Mount Sahand. A river originating from the Sahand peaks passes through the valley.

There are a number of natural springs to the north of the river, the water from which has traditionally been used for the treatment of kidney stones, according to the locals. The physical structure of the village looks like images from fairy tales. Natural cones, scattered over a vast area, serve as human dwellings on rock formations which themselves seem to have been the work of certain sculptors. The road from Tabriz goes through this natural artwork.

On getting nearer to the dwellings, the visitor finds out two or three of these hollow interconnected cones with features such as openings on their surface playing the role of actual windows. The lowest cones are used as tables and those on top as the living quarters.

The village of Kandovan is also part of the Lake Urmia region (also spelt Urmiyeh or Urmiya), the region where the predecessors of the Persians and the Medes first entered recorded history in a 844 BCE Assyrian inscription, and the region that is central to the start of the second phase of Zoroastrian history.

It is our understanding that the unusual cone formations were formed from volcanic ash and debris spewed during an eruption of Mount Sahand being hardened and shaped by the elements over thousands of years. The formation of volcanic ash cones is local to Kandovan. Elsewhere, the ash blanketed the land. The existence of a high volume of ash and pumice far from Sahand's crater indicates that Mount Sahand erupted with a gigantic explosion in the distant past. Sahand's rock is about a million years old and the last eruption of Mount Sahand is thought to have occurred within the Holocene epoch, that is within the last 11,000 years. Today, Mount Sahand is a dormant volcano consisting of a crater lake encircled by twelve peaks, the tallest of which rises to a height of 3707 m. or 12,162 feet.

Most of the cave houses are two to four storeys in height. In a typical four storey house, the ground or first floor is used as an animal shelter, the next two floors are used as living areas, and the top floor is used for storage. There are reports of tunnels connecting towers owned by a person or family.

Legend has it that Kandovan’s first inhabitants moved there in the 13th century to escape from the invading Mongol army. They dug hideouts in the volcanic rocks but eventually decided to settle in these caves which they gradually developed and transformed into multi-storey, permanent houses. Since then, many generations of their descendants have continued living in the same houses.

The houses are known as karan in the local dialect. One interpretation has the word Kandovan being a plural form of kando, a bee's hive. Another interpretation says that Kandovan means Land of Unknown Carvers. The use of 'van' to indicate the plural is found in the Avesta: cf. ashavan. Nowadays, residents speak a Turkic dialect but have traditional Iranian family names, names such as Kayani. The mountains and rivers in the region have both Persian and Turkic - and perhaps even Assyrian - names.

The present residents say that their village is around 700 years old, and was formed by people fleeing from an advancing Mongol army and who used the caves as a refugee and a place of hiding. Even after the Mongol occupation of the country came to an end, many of the refugees decided to continue living in the caves and gradually expanded their cave homes to form permanent multi-storey houses. Another legend states that eight hundred years ago a body of soldiers hid in the caves during a military campaign.

However, there are indications that the present cave dwellers are successors of earlier 1600-3000 years ago cave dwellers which would have made them contemporaneous to the first known presence of Zoroastrians in the region.

While we must await systematic archaeological and anthropological studies of Kandovan to confirm any direct connection to early Zoroastrians, the style of the Kandovan settlement has some parallels to a form of settlement mentioned in Zoroastrian scriptures, the Avesta. The first mention and description of a planned Aryan township in the Avesta is the Jamshidi Vara (also see Pamiri houses). If, as some have done, the word vara is translated as 'cave', then Kandovan becomes a candidate for a Jamshidi style vara even though the body of references to the location of the early Aryan homeland is more towards Central Asia and the Pamirs than towards the Middle East.

The climate of Kandovan also coincides with the Avesta's description of a weather change that instigated the creation of varas, namely, a greater number of cool months than warm months in a year accompanied by the onset of severe winters. While the weather in the region has likely changed over the past ten thousand years, Kandovan still receives a fair amount of winter snow. In addition, the number of cool months in Kandovan exceeds the number of warm months.

South from Kandovan are reports of other cave dwellers and their choice of living style.

In 317 BCE, the Macedonian commander Antigonus Monophthalmus is quoted as saying that he encountered Kossaeans (Kassites), calling them cavemen.

In Nomads and the Outside World, p.103, Anatoly Michailovich Khazanov states "Curtius Rufus (1st century CE) describes how the Mardeans (one of the nomadic Persian people according to Herodotus) dug caves in the mountains and hid in them with their wives and children (V.6.17)...". Khazanov adds as a footnote, "It is curious that the habit of using caves as winter shelters for livestock continues has been preserved up to the present day by semi-nomadic Kurds and Lurs..."

Some translations of the word vara as a cave add an underground feature to the caves. To find the closest examples of a settlement based in a network of underground caves, we need to look to the ancient land of Cappadocia presently in Central Turkey. Cappadocia was mentioned by the historian Strabo as having a fire temple.

The cave settlements in Turkey are similar to the cave settlement of Kandovan. They have also been the subject of archaeological examination. As a result, we may be able to glean some concept of the antiquity of Kandovan's cave dwellings from the study of the Turkish cave dwellings, where, even though the recent phase of habitation dates from the 5th to 6th century CE, murals and monuments indicate pre-Turkic habitation in the (Indo-Iranian) Hittite period (18th to 12th century BCE). Certain cave-based settlements in Turkey have evidence of habitation since 4000 BCE.

The attractions of Kandovan, however, are not restricted to its unusual cave dwellings. It is located in a green and scenic valley where wild plants and particularly natural spring waters are reputed to have healing properties. The spring waters which are traditionally used to cure kidney problems draw many people from surrounding towns and beyond to this area. The combination of Kandovan’s natural landscape and resources, and above all the unique way in which its inhabitants have adapted to the environment, has made it a popular destination for visitors.

Some of the area's wild plants as also reputed to have healing and vitality-giving properties. The combination of Kandovan's unique natural landscape, beauty, and the manner in which its inhabitants have adapted to the environment, has made Kandovan a popular destination for visitors.

About 300,000 people visit the village each year (the resident population is only 670) and a cave hotel with ten rooms was opened in 2007 to accommodate visitors who wish to stay over a night or more. Before the opening of the hotel, visitors to Kandovan were obliged to make a day trip from Tabriz 60 km to the north. It is only a matter of time before the local population begins to rely on tourism as a major source of income, thereby supplanting their traditional pastoral and agricultural way of life.

While Mount Sahand itself is somewhat stark, the surrounding country abounds in a natural beauty that is today but a shadow of a legendary past. Some believe that legendary past beauty is preserved in the biblical story of the Garden of Eden. Ancient Persian gardens, also called baghs, where renowned for their spectacular beauty. Their name pairidaeza became the English word paradise. The baghs were a paradise on earth.

Watch the Video: http://www.jadidonline.com/images/stori ... _high.html

http://www.iranreview.org/content/Docum ... ndovan.htm




Image

Image
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: Kandovan village

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Feb 24, 2014 7:15 am

Image

Image

Image
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Laleh Rocky Hotel of Kandovan

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Feb 24, 2014 7:40 am

The Laleh Rocky Hotel is one of the most unique hotel properties in the world and an attraction unto itself. A 4-star hotel located in the charming village of Kandovan in Tabriz, this hotel is built entirely into a rocky cliff-face, with caves being converted to hotel rooms. All the comfortable rooms have under floor heating and some have whirlpool baths. Stay in this remarkable Rock Hotel. It is a true experience and a place never to forget. The staff and the people in Kandovan are amazing friendly and you will find your self century’s back. Staying in the rock hotel make you feel the facilities of a 5 star in the ancient rocks.
Hotel Type
Adventure Type, Boutique.
Hotel Facilities
Hotel Restaurant & Café, Fax-Photocopying, Laundry, Restaurant (buffet), Air-conditioning, Heating, Restaurants, Bar, Luggage storage room, Wake-up call, 24 Hours Reception, Souvenir & Gift Shop, Private court yard, 24h Taxi Service, Multilingual Staff, VIP Assistance.

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/s ... =firefox-a


Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Feb 24, 2014 7:43 am

Also some archaeologists believe that it dates back to pre-Islamic era. These houses resemble caves, being "dug out" in the mountains and therefore are reputed worldwide. Mineral water in this area is also used for treatment of disease. Mineral water, unique houses, green valleys, pleasure weather, dairy products and mountainous honey are factors which absorb many tourists every year.
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Kandovan mineral water spring-Kandovan SPA

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Jan 26, 2015 6:17 am

Location: 62 km from the Tabriz city
Kandovan is a rare and historic village from 22 kilometers of south Osku, is located among the beautiful valley and river with the same name. Distance from Kandovan village till Tabriz is 62 km. The village has very famous spa of the same name. Spring water is drinkable and in the treatment of renal diseases is very important. Therefore, kidney patients from far and near for the treatment and use of spring water or refer to their villages or buy spring water from sellers in the city of Tabriz.
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Kandovan village

Postby Parvaneh » Sat Jan 31, 2015 12:59 pm

Location :Osku town
Kandovan one of the villages of east Azerbaijan province is located in Sahand village in the central part of the Oscu city. The village has many tourist attractions because of its homes, that has been dug into the mountains like a beehive. Honey is the main souvenir of this village. Kandovan, one of the three rock villages in the world that due to its attractivenessis unique. Kandovan village architecture and old texture and style of living is considered as an exception in the world because someone else does not live in Cappadocia and South Dakota. Kandovan is a village built on cliff and the only structure of the village is from rocks. Homes are pyramidal and for animals are also holes in the rocks. Kandovan is summer immigration region of Sahand mountains which the green pastures attracts many of nomads. Kandovan Spa is also one of the attractions of this six thousand years old village. The spring water with the lowest percentage of weight is very useful for the treatment of kidney disease. Professor "David Roll" English renowned archaeologist, on a trip to Iran and discovered the world's first postal route, the antiquity of Kandovan on this route one of his citations to theories of Adam fall- cave human sedentarization, human social life.
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: Kandovan village-Kandowan Village-Candovan

Postby Parvaneh » Tue Mar 31, 2015 6:02 am

In Kandovan Village, the chambers' gateway is next to a small pond made of cement, which is separated from the main room with a small wall and is the place for washing clothes, dishes, and bathing. Currently, this village maintains pipelined drinking water.

At the body of chambers, appropriate cavities have been dug for maintenance of the villagers' everyday needs. In some of the chambers, there exists a low-altitude stone-made platform which is covered with carpets or rugs and is used as the resting place of the family members. Due to insulation of the chambers' walls, outer air doesn't penetrate inside and therefore chambers are cold in summer and relatively warm in winter.

Many of these chambers are warm in winter and are directly exposed to sun rays. Due to thickness of the walls, the gateways to these chambers are usually short and don't extend 160 centimeters in height. The doors' width is one meter to 120 centimeters. To prevent the infiltration of snow flakes and rainfall, the doors and windows are made in the inner side of these chambers.

The appropriate regional climate has led to fertility of the lands of this village and the best farmlands of Kandovan village are situated in a high-altitude plain, which is situated in front of the village. The green valley of Kandovan maintains one of the best climates of mountainous regions across Iran. A relatively large creek runs through this valley, which is also home to several mineral water ponds. The Kandovan's mineral water is used as a remedy for many ailments and it is said to be effective in dissolving kidney stones. Also the green meadows of Sahand Mountain are used as important animal husbandry hubs. This village is also known for its premium dairy products and honey.

The population of this village stands at 700 people, while villagers are farmers, or engaged in animal husbandry and production of handicrafts. The most famous handicrafts of the villagers are carpets and rugs which are woven by women. Also the women villagers dry vegetables and plants such as nettle, selling them at the village's market. Medical herbs, honey, walnut, and almonds, in addition to handicrafts are the souvenirs of this village.

It can be said that the unique architecture of this village and its surrounding scenic landscape has created a world of beauty. The multiple, double, and cone-shaped chambers dug at the heart of rocks have created a pretty scene. In fact, this village has been registered among the national works of art for its unique architecture and fiber.

Mineral water springs, unique homes, green valley, appropriate climate, and premium dairy products and honey draw the attention of several tourists to this village in spring and summer seasons, and the presence of a hotel dug at the heart of rocks in this village raises an opportunity for the tourists to experience comfort, and to reconcile with the nature.

http://english.irib.ir/
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times


Return to Famous Villages of Iran

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron