-->
-->

Turkman Tribes: Cultural & Athletic traditions & Rites

Helpful information about Specials of Iran like windmills and wind-catchers and...

Re: Turkman Tribes: Cultural & Athletic traditions & Rites

Postby Barbara J. Stephens » Mon Sep 08, 2014 11:47 am

No doubt that culture of Iran is famous among the tourist because specially dress of ladies are very attractive for every tourist and may be in this season i will be go with my wife to the Iran tour..
Have you ever been travel to new york knoxville in bus http://www.getbusticket.com/new-york-ny-to-knoxville-tn.html with this bus service?
Barbara J. Stephens
 
Posts: 98
Joined: Thu Mar 20, 2014 9:45 am
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 8 times

Re: Turkman Tribes: Cultural & Athletic traditions & Rites

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Apr 26, 2015 11:30 am

The Turkmen people have lived in Central Asia for several thousand years. The economic mainstay of the Turkmens is animal husbandry. Due to variability of the climate, they were forced to settle in different regions throughout the four seasons of the year, in the company of their livestock and cattle. Hence, they were always looking for meadows for their livestock. These continuous migrations have turned Turkmens into hardworking and courageous people. It can be said that the reasons behind the rush of Turkmens to different regions have been droughts, a rising population, and the sudden death of their livestock.

In general, there was always a current of migrating Turk and Mongol tribes of Central Asia, destined for other lands. They mainly immigrated to China and Iran because the cold plains of Siberia; the high altitudes of Tibet and Himalaya Mountains were not appropriate for their settlement. Therefore, Iran, throughout its course of history, as of the reign of Sassanid Dynasty, has always been linked with the Turk and Mongol ethnicities from the northeast. As of the waning years of the reign of Sassanid Dynasty, the Turk and Mongol ethnicities flocked to the regions of North Khorasan and gradually expanded the summer and winter quarters for their livestock, while some of them also resided in rural regions and cities. The Mongol and Turk migrants gradually became familiar with the civilization and original culture of Iran. In the 3rd Century AH, Turks were divided into different branches; one of which shaped the Turkmens, later on.

The Turkmen ethnicity took shape in 7th and 8th Centuries AH, leading to formation of Turkmen tribes.

The Turkmens, who reside in Iran, have settled in regions, stretching from the eastern coastlines of the Caspian Sea to Maraveh Tappeh in Golestan Province and the region of Jargalaan in Khorasan Province. The Turkmens of Iran are divided into two main groups of Yomut and Goklan. The Yomuts live across the Caspian Sea coastlines and plains, while the Goklans have resided on the Kalaaleh and Golidaagh foothills. The latter group is active in farming, horticulture, apiculture, and cultivation of sunflowers.

The Turkmen people speak in Turkmen language, which is linguistically rooted in Turkish languages.

The common literature of Turkmens is divided into written and oral literature. The written literature of Turkmen people, who reside in Iran and Turkmenistan, dates back to 500 years ago. Among the Turkmen renowned poets one can name Dolat Mohammad Azadi, who was one of the famous poets of 12th Century AH, and Qorban Dordi Zalili, the Turkmen poet of the 13th Century AH.

The oral or folkloric literature of Turkmens is also enriched and has highly influenced the culture and civilization of neighboring nations. The most important types of Turkmen oral literature include stories, legends, adages, riddles, and songs.

Turkmen legends speak of the lives, heroic efforts, and struggles of the hardworking and disadvantaged strata of the community. The aspiration of the Turkmen hero throughout the legends is to save and rescue the people of his tribe from the yoke of bullies. The heroes often face several hardships and obstacles, while overcoming all hurdles, which have targeted the comfort and prosperity of their tribe.

The Turkmens have also inherited a huge collection of adages, which reflect the experiences, thoughts, and advises of their ancestors.

The riddles are also another part of the oral literature of Turkmens. This branch of oral literature is tied to the nomadic life of Turkmens. But, the most important part of the oral literature of Turkmens are the Turkmen lyrics and songs, which maintain educational and moral aspects; picture the beauties of the nature; speak of animals such as horses; and exchange kind words.

"Houdy" is also considered to fall into the category of Turkmens' oral literature. Houdy in Turkmen language refers to the words of wisdom which the mother or sister of an infant sing next to the baby's cradle to calm down the child. Houdy reflects all the wishes and ideals of Turkmen women. Houdy is in fact a particular lullaby. In a Houdy, the Turkmen mothers whisper the happenings of the surrounding environment in the framework of a pleasant language in the ears of the children, detailing the ancient and traditional tales of Turkmens, coupled with their aspirations and demands.

Now that you became familiar with the language of Turkmens and the features of this ethnicity, you should know that Turkmens are Muslims. They lead a simple life, and are kind, committed, honest, active, and hospitable, trying their best to serve their guests, by offering them tea, bread, butter and jam, and local confectionary.

http://english.irib.ir

Image
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Turkmens' handicrafts-Handicraft of Torkaman

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Apr 27, 2015 10:36 am

Handicrafts are of paramount importance among Turkmens. They meet their needs through production of handicrafts; alongside their main activities such as agriculture and animal husbandry. Carpet weaving, rug weaving and felting are the main sources of income for Turkmen families, which are usually managed by women. The Turkmen women are also engaged in needlework, and silk worm breeding. Meanwhile, needlework productions are mainly for personal consumption among the Turkmen families. Given that carpet weaving is one of the main handicrafts of Turkmens, we start this program by introduction of this handicraft.

One of the most important handicrafts of Turkmen women is carpet weaving. The majority of Turkmen villagers and urbanites have at least one rug loom in their houses. The Turkmen women are mainly engaged in carpet weaving, which is transferred like a legacy from the mother of the family to her daughters. The Turkmen women start carpet weaving as of a very young age. The economic importance of carpet weaving among Turkmen families is such that the skill in carpet-weaving is one of the criteria of Turkmens for marriage, especially in Turkmen villages.

Carpets maintain materialistic and cultural importance. Upon the study of patterns that are produced by Turkmen women on carpets, one realizes that the Turkmen carpets have been in fact the protector of culture, and beliefs of these people.

No prepared pattern is used in Turkmen's carpet weaving; and in fact the beauties of nature originate the carpet patterns which we have inherited. The patterns of these carpets are geometrical. One of the differences of Turkmen carpets with the carpets of other regions of Iran is the limitation of dyes used in Turkmen carpets. The red color is the main color of Turkmen carpets, which grants an especial glitter to them. The Turkmen women weave carpets in different shapes and sizes for a variety of needs and consumptions.

One of the other activities of Turkmen women is felting. The main element used in felting is wool that is abundant among Turkmens, who are engaged in animal husbandry. The abundance and cheapness of wool has led to development of felting industry among Turkmens engaged in animal husbandry, in addition to Turkmen immigrants. In addition to its light weight, felts are used for protection against moisture and cold. Felts are produced with the participation of women through a number of steps. They are mainly made base of the natural colors of wool, including white, black, grey and brown.

Among Turkmens, felts are for a number of uses, such as clothing for shepherds and horses. Also, felts are used as ceilings and inner walls of arbors by Turkmens.

Rug-weaving is one of the activities of Turkmen women. They use beautiful geometrical patterns that originate from their surrounding environment in rug-weaving. These light and pretty rugs decorate Turkmen's arbors. The rugs are used as prayer mats in the majority of rural and urban homes.

One of the most delicate and beautiful handicrafts of Turkmen women is needlework, which decorates the hats of men and women and the clothing of Turkmen women. In these needlework productions, the taste and creativity of Turkmen women are presented within the framework of local traditional patterns. Nearly all of Turkmen women are familiar with this valuable handicraft.

The needlework is not considered as an economic mainstay by the Turkmen women, and is mainly for personal consumption or presentation to relatives, which, in turn, has led to high beauty and delicacy of this art.

In addition to handicrafts, the ornaments of Turkmen women is also of paramount importance, which include necklaces, bracelets, and hairpins. Gold and silver are used in their production.

Meanwhile, as you know, clothing of are importance in familiarization with the culture of any group, and can manifest the cultural and ethnical traits of people. The clothing of Turkmen women is simple and diverse; and is in particular shapes for different age groups. Meanwhile, in this program, we study the clothing of Turkmen women, in general.

The Turkmen women wear long clothing which is named Koynek. The collar of this clothing is decorated with needlework in simple and delicate patterns. Due to the strong belief of Turkmen women in the sacred religion of Islam, they completely comply with Hejab. They use large silk-made scarves for covering their hair.

The Turkmen girls wear a hat underneath their head scarves. The women of a number of Turkmen tribes wear a headband over their scarves, after their marriage.

The clothing of Turkmen men is highly influenced by the clothing of other Iranians. The traditional Turkmen clothing is only seen among Turkmens, who live far from cities. The traditional hats of Turkmen men are in a semi-circular shape, covered with wool.

Image
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: Turkman Tribes: Cultural & Athletic traditions & Rites

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Apr 27, 2015 10:41 am

Image
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Marriage of Turkmens-Torkaman Marriage

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Apr 27, 2015 10:44 am

Given that the study of traditions and laws related to marriage of Turkmens can contribute to our appropriate understanding of this ethnicity, we have allocated today's article to the wedding traditions among Turkmens. Meanwhile, one should note that wedding ceremonies maintain a number of differences in different Turkmen tribes.

Turkmens, like other ethnicities, believe that all individuals should get married. This viewpoint is the result of Turkmen's religious beliefs and their nomadic lifestyle. The phenomenon of marriage among these people, especially among Turkmen nomads and villagers, has not gone through major changes, and therefore roots of nomadic lifestyle are clearly evident in their wedding ceremonies. On this basis, the Turkmens still marry at a young age and are still committed to their customs and traditions, despite the developments which have taken shape in their social life in the recent years. The Turkmens prefer to choose their future spouse from their own tribe. The marriage of Turkmens with non-Turkmens is highly rare and even if it takes place it would be unacceptable in accordance to the norms of Turkmen community.

The Turkmens maintain a set of special values for selection of their spouse, and in doing so; Turkmens consider the characteristics of the mother of their future wives. They believe they should choose a spouse, whose mother manifests merited characteristics. Also the capability of women in discharging their daily duties, their physical health, skills, and patience in the face of adversities are the characteristics which are taken into account in assessment of future spouses. In regard to men, their financial ability and honesty are taken into consideration.

Given that the commencement of married life is an uplifting experience for all, this phase of life starts with a set of special customs and traditions; each of which show the beliefs and values governing the Turkmen community. In fact, the marriage of Turkmens consists of a number of phases. In the first place, the parents of the groom decide in this regard and try to win the support of the bride's father. In this phase, the father of the family makes decisions about the marriage of his child with a peer family, and sends a seasoned and elderly relative to the bride's family. Upon the approval of the bride's family, the next phases take place.

The next phase is the marriage proposal. In this manner, the groom's family, after being informed of the agreement of bride's family, sets an appropriate time for sending the female relatives of the groom to the bride's family; with the bride's family receiving the guests. Only women take part in this ceremony, while the groom's family brings homemade breads, baked by Turkmen women, as a present to the bride's home. These traditional breads are locally referred to as "Saachaaq". The exchange of these local breads between the families of the groom and the bride take place with the intention of establishment of friendly ties, and provision of the needed breads for the wedding ceremony.

The next stage in Turkmen's marriage ceremonies is determination of the milk money, which include cash and assets such as sheep, cows, rams, and camels.

The next phase is the wedding ceremony. On this occasion, the groom's family sacrifices a sheep, taking it to the bride's house in addition to a number of other presents. On this day, the bride sits in another Turkmen nomadic tent, or in the house of one of her relatives such as her brother or uncle, and covers her face from the female relatives of the groom. The bride highly respects her husband's relatives, especially her mother-in-law and rarely speaks in their presence.

The wedding ceremony is an occasion of festivity. On her way to the groom's house, the bride wears a red headscarf. The red color is the sign of happiness among Turkmens. Immediately after the arrival of the bride in the groom's house, the groom's family receives the guests, and in the afternoon, the wedlock ceremony takes place in the presence of a cleric at the groom's house.

One of the Turkmen ceremonies during the wedding is the Sechmek ceremony, in which a number of groom's male relatives throw coins, or items such as hats, tissues, and shoes among the guests. Whoever catches an object and returns it to the one, who threw it, will be given a prize which is usually a sum of money. Only men take part in this ceremony. Another ceremony which takes place on the wedding day is the wrestling match, while the winners are awarded prizes by the groom's family. Those, who maintain a high financial ability, hold horse riding competitions on the wedding day.

One of the other merited traditions of Turkmens is the Festivity of Consultation, which is one of their age-old customs. It is based on a sense of cooperation and respect among individuals. In this manner, whenever a family announces that it intends to hold a wedding ceremony, up to seven families in their neighborhood assist that family in the related ceremonies. This merited tradition has remained to this day among the Turkmen tribes. For instance, this cooperation is evident in preparing food, transferring messages, and pitching tents during the wedding ceremonies.

The norms of Turkmen community are in line with protection and reinforcement of the family, because the strength of any family boosts the credibility of that tribe, and any measure which would shake the solidness of the family is strongly opposed by the members of Turkmen community. Hence, divorce is not accepted by the Turkmens and is a very rare phenomenon among them.

http://english.irib.ir/


Image
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: Turkman Tribes: Cultural & Athletic traditions & Rites

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Apr 27, 2015 10:50 am

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: Turkman Tribes: Cultural & Athletic traditions & Rites

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Apr 27, 2015 10:53 am

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Previous

Return to Other Specials of Iran

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 21 guests

cron