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Meymand village-Meimand village

Helpful information about famous villages in Iran like name, introduction, maps, requirements and...

Meymand village-Meimand village

Postby Parvaneh » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:30 pm

Introduction: Meymand (Persian: ميمند‎, also Romanized Maymand is believed to be one of human's primary residencies in Iranian Plateau. According to experts its history stretches from 12,000 years ago.

Located near to Shahr -e- Babak city in Kerman Province, the Village consists of a number of amazing natural and manmade caves that are still used today for housing and shelter. Currently a scarce population of about 150 people continue to live there. The origins of Meymand date back to the time when the inhabitants of the Persian plateau had not yet started to bury their dead in traditional graves but rather placed them inside crypts carved in the mountain.

Sandwiched between a desert and mountain, Meymand enjoys a mountainous climate with cold winters and exceedingly hot summers and abundant with mulberry and blackberry trees. Then living conditions in Meymand are harsh due to the aridity of the land and to high temperatures in summers and very cold winters.

The old houses of Meymand Village are carved like caverns inside the mountain. The internal spaces have corridors and pillars showing a rural architecture. The houses are situated in four or five stories, one on top of the other. There is a stove inside each house used for heating and cooking. The inward spaces are black because of smoke and soot. There is also an area of around 400 square meters in the Village containing 15 circular stone rooms. Bones and other belongings were discovered there, giving the impression that it was used to lay the bodies of the deceased.

The discovery of stone engravings, some as old as 10,000 years, around the Village in addition to 6,000 year old pottery reveal the long lived history of the Village. According to the locals, the ancients did not use a hammer and chisel, but rather a type of local, pointed stone which is hard enough to carve images onto the rocks. This method of carving is still practiced in the region today.

Meymand Village is one of the oldest continually inhabited places in Iran. The inhabitants are semi-nomadic shepherds, some of whom own village land that is occupied in winter, whereas in summer the population moves to higher pastures. The local language contains many words from the ancient Sassanid and Pahlavi languages, the language barely changing due to the isolation of the village. The economy of the villagers is based on agriculture, animal husbandry and carpet weaving; but carpet weaving is more important to the extent that Meymand carpets enjoy international fame. Since carpet weaving is prevalent in the area, other related jobs such as dyeing, felt making, weaving of gilims and crochet working are common too.

The area is also home to various animals such as snakes, lizards, hedgehogs, deer, leopards, wolves, foxes and also birds of prey. There are a few seasonal rivers and springs around the village which fairly contribute in flourishing of agriculture in the area.

There is a large inn inside Meymand Village which is used to host tourists. Meymand Village obtained the ‘Reward of Mercury’ as the seventh cultural, natural and historical scene of the world in September 2005. This reward is given by the Greek government, in collaboration with UNESCO, to the historical monuments that are unique from the viewpoint of culture, nature and history.


Source:Tehrantimes

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Location: Kerman Province

Days of trip: (Without air plane) 2-3 Days from Tehran to Tehran (Without heavy traffic you need About 12-13 hr driving from Tehran to Meymand)
Attention: In holidays there is heavy traffic in all roads around Tehran.

Best time to visit: Spring

Daily time visit: No limit

Difficulty level: Easy

Requirements: (Depend on your plan) Guide or GPS track, water, food, warm and waterproof clothes and tent, waterproof shoes, headlamp

Legal permission need: No

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Overall risk: No

Animal risk: No

Lost risk: No

Rescue: Yes, you can call 115

GSM Mobile Antenna: Yes

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Hotel: Yes

Shop: Yes

Gasoline: Yes

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How to get there:
1- Go to Baihaghi or west terminal of buses in Tehran (more info
2- Take a bus ticket to Kerman.( Distance from Tehran to Kerman is 989 Km)
3- Take a taxi from Kerman to Meymand. ( Distance from Kerman to Meymand is 227 Km)


Nearest airport: Kerman airport

Nearest train station: Khatoon Abaad Station

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Location on map:




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Parvaneh
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Re: Meymand

Postby Parvaneh » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:31 pm

Meymand Village is a 12,000-year-old village located in Shahr-e Babak, Kerman province, 35 kilometers from the town of Babak on Tehran-Bandar Abbas Road.


Unlike other villages, Meymand has retained its ancient culture. Living conditions in Meymand are harsh due to the aridity of land and high temperatures in summers and winters, HistoricalIran reported.
The village consists of amazing natural and manmade caves that are still used for housing and shelter. Currently, only about 150 people continue to live there.
The origins of Meymand date back to the time when the inhabitants of the Persian plateau had not yet started to bury their dead in traditional graves, but placed them inside crypts carved in the mountain. This belief has been attributed to the followers of the goddess Mithra.

Structure of Houses
The old houses of Meymand Village are carved like caverns inside the mountain and had corridors and pillars.
The houses are made of four or five stories. There is a stove inside each house for heating and cooking.
The inner spaces are black because of smoke and soot. There is also an area of around 400 square meters in the village containing 15 circular rooms.
Bones and other remains were discovered there, giving the impression that it was used to lay the bodies of the deceased.
The discovery of stone engravings, some as old as 10,000 years, in addition to 6,000-year-old pottery, reveal the long history of the Village.
According to the locals, the ancient inhabitants did not use a hammer and chisel, but rather a type of local, pointed stone that is hard enough to carve images onto the rocks. This method of carving is still practiced in the region.
Local Language and Products
Meymand Village is one of the oldest, continually inhabited places in Iran. The inhabitants are semi-nomadic shepherds, some of whom own village land that is occupied in winter, whereas in summer the population moves to higher pastures.
The local language contains many words from the ancient Sassanid and Pahlavi languages, which have barely changed due to the isolation of the village.
The economy of the villagers is based on agriculture, animal husbandry and carpet weaving. However, carpet weaving is more important to the extent that Meymand’s carpets enjoy international fame.
Since carpet weaving is prevalent in the area, other related jobs include dyeing, felt making, kilim weaving and crochet-works.

Climate and Natural Attractions
Sandwiched between a desert and a mountain, Meymand enjoys a mountainous climate with cold winters and exceedingly hot summers. It has abundant mulberry and blackberry trees.
The area is also home to animals such as snakes, lizards, hedgehogs, deer, leopards, wolves, foxes and also birds of prey.
There are a few seasonal rivers and springs around the village, which contribute to the flourishing of agriculture in the area. There is a large inn inside Meymand Village for hosting tourists.
Meymand Village obtained the “Reward of Mercury” as the seventh cultural, natural and historical site of the world in September 2005.
This title is awarded by the Greek government, in collaboration with UNESCO, to historical monuments that are unique from the viewpoint of culture, nature and history.

Source: Iran Daily


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Re: Meymand

Postby Parvaneh » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:32 pm

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Re: Meymand

Postby Kathrine321 » Thu Nov 21, 2013 10:41 am

Parvaneh wrote:
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I like this beautiful place so much. I really like your all selection of images and I thought it’s a nice place for tourism. Your post is so nice and I really appreciate to you for this beautiful and attractive post. Nice post.
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Re: Meymand village

Postby Parvaneh » Sat Feb 08, 2014 4:14 pm

Meymand: An amazing village

Man and nature have joined hands to create one of the world’s most amazing places in southern Iran.
Meymand Village attracts thousands of tourists throughout the year to see its cavern-like houses and experience the traditional rural culture of the region, Presstv wrote.
The ancient village is located in Kerman province, some 35 kilometers from the historical city of Shahr-e-Babak, or the city of Babak, which is said to be the birthplace of the founder of Sassanid Dynasty.
Meymand dates back to the time when the inhabitants of the Persian plateau placed their dead inside crypts carved into mountains.
The population of the village varies from 100 to 1,200, depending on the season of the year. The residents lead a nomadic life and move to higher pastures to escape the warm summer during which the population declines to its lowest level.
Situated between a desert and a mountain, Meymand enjoys a mountainous climate with freezing winters and hot summers.

Unique Architecture
The traditional houses of the village are hewn into rocks and include corridors, pillars and a stove which is used for both cooking and heating the home during the freezing winters.
Locals say their ancestors did not use hammer and chisels, but a type of hard pointed stone to carve into rocks. The method is still practiced in the region today.
The current inhabitants built their cave houses, known as Kicheh, by chiseling six-to-nine-meter horizontal cuts into the hillside’s soft sedimentary rocks.
Meymand’s sedimentary rocks are malleable enough to be shaped by hand, and hard enough to support the roof of these cave houses.
There are about 400 Kichehs in Meymand. Each Kicheh spans an area of about 16 to 20 square meters and is nearly two meters high.
Built one on top of another, their houses usually consist of a single square or round room with carved windows. Some dwellings are windowless and dark due to lack of natural light and soot-coated walls.
Larger houses have more than one room and sometimes consist of an adjacent stable. Doors are usually rectangular and made of wood, with a latch that locks onto a hole drilled into a stone frame.
The thresholds of Kicheh doors are 15 to 20 centimeters above the ground to keep water from flowing into the house from the alley. In lower units, there is often a trench before the entrance with walls high enough to accommodate a dwelling unit.
In some parts, the lower units are grouped together so that the entrance trenches of up to five houses open onto a terrace, which is used for family and social gatherings. Villagers also use round sedimentary rocks to build dividing walls and buildings.
Those who spend summers in the village build special dwellings called Kapars, which are made to allow the circulation of air to cool the interiors
Meymand’s villagers use another type of shelter known as Gonbeh, which are not as cool as Kapars. Gonbehs are circular structures with stone walls and a conical roof made of wooden rafters.
The nomads of Meymand also make different types of shelters outside the village, such as Aghol, Abadi and Pollas. These shelters are usually made of wood and stone.
Aghols are constructed as semi-subterranean buildings, similar to a Gonbeh. Abadis are built above the ground. Pollas is a type of tent made of a white fabric with cotton warps and wefts made of goat wool.
Tourist Facilities
Tourists, who arrive in the village, can either stay in an eight-room guesthouse or enjoy staying in cozy cave houses.
Guesthouse rooms are covered with pressed wool felt called Namad in Persian, and carpets. Beds are carved into the walls and there is lighting and hot water.
Meymand also has a public bath, a school, a restaurant, a museum and a number of shops mostly offering herbal medicine and traditional handicrafts.
The village has maintained its original architecture and traditions, and the language, which has barely changed due to the isolated location of the village, still contains Sassanid and Pahlavi words.
Meymand might appear rather stark and unattractive at first sight compared to similar villages in Iran and other countries, as there is no sign of any flowers and villagers have not tried to decorate or add color to their alleys and rocky dwellings.
The outfits used by villagers are somber colored and no music is usually heard in the village.
The people of Meymand usually eat simple meals consisting of flat bread, yogurt and a thin soup made of milk and dried herbs. Dairy products, nuts and traditional breads are also part of the regular meals.
The main sources of income for Meymand villagers are farming, animal husbandry and carpet weaving. Their carpets are famous for their beauty and quality.
Carpet weaving has generated many other related jobs in the area such as wool dyeing, felt making, kilim weaving and crocheting.
Some of Meymand’s nomadic villagers spend winters in the village and move with their herds of goat and sheep to the plains in spring. They go to higher pastures and cooler climes during the summer.(source: Iran Daily)

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Re: Meymand village

Postby Cherie Boyce » Thu Mar 20, 2014 9:34 am

Wao that's beauty of the Meymand village in the pics caves look like grave and very horrible things for looking..Any one visit this island give me brief detail...
I enjoying when i go indianapolis to nyc in bus with http://www.getbusticket.com/indianapolis-to-new-york.html
I always booked my ticket in advance online.
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Re: Meymand village

Postby Parvaneh » Tue Feb 24, 2015 1:15 pm

Meymand (also spelt Maymand and Meimand) is a village of troglodytes – cave dwellers – located in the south-eastern Iranian province of Kerman. Meymand (Maymand, Maimand) village has been continuously inhabited for 2,000 to 3,000 years making it one of Iran’s four oldest surviving villages. Some claim that Meymand / Maymand village has been inhabited for 12,000 years, that is, since the “middle stone ages”, making it a Mesolithic village. Reportedly, 10,000 year old stone engravings and 6,000 year-old pottery have been discovered at the site.

The village is a UNESCO world heritage site and was awarded UNESCO’s 2005 Melina Mercouri prize.

Meymand village is located some 35 kilometres northeast of the town of Babak – Shahr-e Babak, a Kermani town on the road that runs between Tehran in the north and the port of Bandar Abbas in the south. Shahr-e Babak means Babak’s city and Shahr-e Babak is said to be the birthplace of the founder of the Persian Sassanian dynasty c.200 CE The road from Shahr-e Babak rises into the surrounding mountains until it reaches Meymand at an elevation of 2240 metres.

meymandAnother site with numerous petroglyphs is the Eshkaft grotto, eight kilometres north of Meymand / Maymand. The grotto, a shallow cave with a large mouth, is reached by travelling on a dirt road that heads northwest from the village and passes through the Lakheiss region in the Lakhorin heights. The road terminates at the foot of Tekhorin mountain in whose slopes Eshkaft is located. Visitors are known to light and place candles beside the rock art.

Meymand is one of the districts of Shahr-e-Babak, and is one of the spectacular villages of Iran. Here there are a mass of crypts, with 15 stony, circular and roof-less chambers. The same covers an area of approximately 400 sq. m. This vicinity seems to be a place of burial, as skeleton bones and other articles have been found here. The stony mosque of Meymand is another interesting site in this village. The ancient houses in this rural settlement resemble minarets constructed in the breast of this hard stone mountains. In these minaret shaped dwellings which are very strong and durable, are chambers, corridors and pillars displaying an intriguing architecture.

meymandRock art can be found in and around Maymand. Three kilometres northeast of Meymand, beside a gravel road that runs towards the Tela valley, lies a hill called Mar Khazineh (Mar in the local dialect means hill). A 350 m. climb down the hill brings us to an estodan (ossuary) plot filled with the scattered pieces of maliciously destroyed ossuaries decorated with rock art. Locals say that these and other ossuaries are from the Zoroastrian-Sassanian era.

Due to the incline of the surrounding valley, these dwellings are placed in a terraced fashion, in four or five steps one after another. These have a height of 2 m. and are nearly 16 – 20 sq. m. in area, and are devoid of windows or chimneys. In the center of each chamber is a stove that was used for cooking purposes as well as warming the dwellings

meymandIndeed we can say that Meymand is parallel to history and is the head of history. According to one of the researches: if you look at Meymand from 0/5 km it seems that you look at the history from a deep cylinder. In other word seeing Meymand means seeing history and the ordinary life of people for who are interested in history, past and its issues. In the other part of his article it has written that Meymand is a place where its history is full of ambiguity.

According to some historian the original history of Meimand belongs to 12000 years ago. They say that there is an inscription in 7 or 8 km Meimand that the mentioned date has been engraved on it. The mosque of Meimand is the other spectacular in the village. Old houses of the village are as minarets in the heart of mountain. These houses represent special rustic architecture. Meymand included among the four recorded villages of Iran in UNESCO.
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