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Qeshm Island-Gheshm island-Jazira-ye Qešm

Helpful information about islands and beaches in Iran like name, introduction, maps, requirements and...

Qeshm Island-Gheshm island-Jazira-ye Qešm

Postby Shahram » Mon Aug 05, 2013 7:50 am

Introduction: Qeshm or Gheshm (Persian: قشم‎, Persian pronunciation: [ɢeʃm]) is an Iranian island situated in the Strait of Hormuz, and separated from the mainland by the Clarence Strait/Khuran in the Persian Gulf. Qeshm Island is located a few kilometers off the southern coast of Iran (Persian Gulf), opposite the port cities of Bandar Abbas and Bandar Khamir. Chahkouh Valley, Portuguese castle, Stars Valley, Naaz Islands, Dolphins in the water Strait are most famous features of this island.


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Location: South of Hormozgan province in Persian golf.

Distance from shore: About 15 km



Days of trip: (Without plane) 4-5 Days from Tehran to Tehran (Without heavy traffic you need 20 hr driving from Tehran to Bandar Abbas, then 1 hr by boat to Qeshm island)
Attention: In holidays there is heavy traffic in all roads around Tehran.

Best time to visit: October to May

Daily time visit: No limit

Difficulty level: Easy

Requirements: (Depend on your plan) Guide or GPS track, water, food, warm and waterproof clothes and tent, waterproof shoes, headlamp

Legal permission need: No


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Overall risk: -

Animal risk: No

Lost risk: No

Rescue: Yes, you can call 115

GSM Mobile Antenna: Yes


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Hotel: Yes

Village: Yes

Shop: Yes

Gasoline: Yes


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How to get there:
1- Go to Baihaghi or sout terminal of buses in Tehran (more info), Also you can use air plane or traine.
2- Take a bus ticket to Bandar Abbas
3- Take a boat to Qeshm island


Nearest airport: Bandar Abbas airport

Nearest train station: Bandar Abbas station


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Location on map:




GPS elevation profile:



Pictures:

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More pictures:

http://www.anobanini.net/forum/showthread.php?4372

http://www.anobanini.net/forum/showthread.php?543

http://www.anobanini.net/forum/showthread.php?1824
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Re: Qeshm Island

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Dec 15, 2013 4:35 am

A journey to the biggest island of Persian Gulf

The beautiful Qeshm Island occupies an area of about 1,500 square kilometers (140 kilometers long and 11 kilometers wide on average) and is the biggest island of the Persian Gulf and is bigger than 22 countries of the world (the area of Qeshm Island is 2.5 times that of Singapore and Bahrain).

The island is a township in Hormuzgan province and is located at the mouth of the Strait of Hormuz. The island is 22 km distant form the provincial capital city of Bandar Abbas and its least distance to the mainland is about 1.8 km, which is between Laft port and Pehel village (near Khamir port). Location of Qeshm Island along east-west inclination of the Iranian coast has divided the Strait of Hormuz into northern and southern parts. The northern part is narrow and shallow, while the southern part is relatively wider and deeper.

Amazing Natural Beauty

Due to its location among warm waters of the Persian Gulf, the climate in Qeshm is warm and average temperature is 26 degrees centigrade. The island is affected by Siberian, Mediterranean, Atlantic, as well as Indian Ocean currents and other currents coming from Saudi Arabia and Sahara. Therefore, it has a long warm and humid season and a short temperate one. Precipitation occurs in temperate seasons while summer is dry. Of course, sometimes due to seasonal currents arriving from the Indian Ocean, there is some rain in August. Average precipitation in Qeshm stands at 12 days per year, which amounts to a total of 153 mm per year. Qeshm is rich as a habitat for reptiles, and some kinds of huge turtles whose number is declining in other parts of the world have been found there. Waters surrounding Qeshm Island are so profuse with life and amazing that you can find something new in every part of the island.

Qeshm Mountains

Mountains on Qeshm Island have a specific form. Most of them are low and are made up of sedimentary layers which are totally parallel and their surface is covered by coral layers as well as bivalves. Only in two places, the parallel and horizontal arrangement of layers has been disrupted due to presence of salt domes. Winds have eroded rocks and their coral layers and have, at times, created shapes which are similar to imaginary animals. Presence of such spectacles has imparted a unique appearance to Qeshm Island.

Salt Caves

Some mountains of Qeshm have turned into salt caves as a result of accumulation of sea water in deep fault and subsequent precipitation of salt. Such caves are not only important as a tourism attraction, but are also significant geological hallmarks. The caves are more than 6 km long. Previously salt caves discovered in Israel were considered the world’s longest salt cave with a length of 5,685 m. Salt domes are more than 570 million years old and date back to Precambrian Period. However, salt domes are younger and date back to about 6,000 years ago.

Namakdan salt dome is among natural attractions of Qeshm Island, which attracts a lot of tourists every year. Namakdan salt dome is the only salt dome in Qeshm Island which extends from southern promontory of Salakh anticline up to the northwestern promontory of Basaeedou anticline. On the map, it roughly looks like a circle with a diameter of 6.5 km x 7 km. Salt caves are located to the south of Namakdan salt dome and are up to 20 m high. Ceilings of the caves are covered with stalactites which have been created as a result of water infiltrating the caves.

Kharbas Caves

These caves which are both natural and manmade are located 10 km from Qeshm city on the slopes of a mountain which faces the sea and Miyankaseh plain. There are four caves, which are connected from within. They believe that such ancient geological phenomena are the result of whirlpools and sedimentation of sand. Not all those caves are natural, but some of them have been carved out by ancient Iranians, who have used them as they needed. Some signs indicate that Kharbas caves have been a dwelling for snakes and some even think that they have been a place for worshipping Mehr (the Goddess of Sun or Mitra).

Coral Islands

Coral islands located near Qeshm Island are the most complete and the liveliest collection of corral reefs present in the Persian Gulf. Despite presence of various colorful aquatics, they are still considered one of the main natural attractions of Qeshm Island. They are more beautiful and diverse on the coasts of Larak and Hengam islands.

Banyan Tree


One of the amazing plants on the island is banyan tree. The tropical tree has a big crown with roots, which are mostly in the air. The best example of this tree is found at Tem Sonnati village of Rourian region which is close to an old mausoleum, which is known as the Old Man of Tem Sonnati. Banyan tree also bears fruit which is orange in color and edible.

Mangrove Forest


Perhaps the most unique attraction on Qeshm Island and the coasts of Persian Gulf for every domestic and foreign tourist is the floating mangrove forest. The forest goes underwater upon high tide and reemerges during low tide. Mangrove forest is made up of a tree called mangrove, which is called Timer in Sistan and Baluchestan, Toul in some southern parts of Iran, and Harra in Bandar Abbas. Arabs call it Shoura and Azam and its size varies from 3 meters to 6 meters. Its seed easily grows on the seabed. The seeds may also grow on the trunk of the parent tree before being detached from it to flow on the water. The salty water plant filters seawater retaining fresh water and repelling salt.

Mangrove forest displays high biodiversity and is a habitat for tropical birds. It is a haven for 150 various species of birds in cold seasons of fall and winter whose number sometimes exceeds hundreds of thousands. They include seagulls, cormorants, flamingoes, storks, pelicans, eagles and falcons. Apart from birds, mangrove forest is a good haven for a variety of other animals including various fish, sea snakes, crabs, clings, various frogs and even mammals. On the whole about 80 percent of aquatics in Persian Gulf spend their spawning time in the area of mangrove forest, which accounts for about 90,000 hectares. Apart from northwestern coasts of Qeshm, which host the bulk of Iran’s mangrove forest, they can also be found 3 km from Tiab port near Minab as well as in Jask region of Chabahar.

Tala Wells


Qeshm Island has resorted to many ways to find the water it needs. One of those ways is to drill wells in the rocks, which sometimes end in gypsum layers and are capable of holding water healthy and cool for a long time. The mound overlooking these wells direct rain water toward the wells and it is for this reason that they are called Tala wells (“Tal” means “mound” in Persian).

Historical Castles

Naderi castle is one of old historical castles on the island, which is located near Laft. This had been a fortress for defending Qeshm Island, but has been worn out in time and is now far from its original grandeur. Iran Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts and Tourism Organization, however is planning to renovate it.

Another historical fortress in Qeshm, which is 400 years old, has been built by the Portuguese soldiers after they arrived in Persian Gulf and occupied such islands as Qeshm and Hormuz. In addition to residence, such castles were used as watchtowers to oversee traffic of warships. The Portuguese fortress has been made of coral stone and mortar. It has two towers and includes chambers, warehouses and wells.

Mosques

There are many mosques in Qeshm Island some of which date back to early centuries after Hegira. The oldest mosque on the island is called Sheikh Barak Mosque, which is located at Kousheh village.

Handicrafts


The islanders have their specific handicrafts, which have been handed down from one generation to another. These products are bought by travelers as souvenirs to remind them of people whose faith is closely intertwined with the natural environment in which they live. Women of Qeshm spend their leisure attending to their homes and children and make colorful ornaments which reflect vividness of life.

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The Natural Beauties of Qeshm Island

Postby Parvaneh » Sat Feb 01, 2014 2:59 pm

The vast territory of Iran is not limited to only 30 provinces. Scores of small and big islands in the Persian Gulf waters, as well as some in the Caspian Sea, are an integral part of Iran's history and culture.
These islands are home to decent and endeavoring people. We talked about the natural beauties of Kish Island in our last week's program. Today we introduce to our readers Qeshm Island - the largest island in the Persian Gulf, which is bigger than the island state of Bahrain.



Qeshm Island with an area of about 1,500 square km is two-and-a-half times bigger than Bahrain. The 135 km long island is located along the Strait of Hormuz and lies parallel to the port of Bandar Abbas on its northeast and the port of Khameer on northwest. The island, at its widest point spans 40 kilometers and at its narrowest point 11 km. It is interesting to note that the Strait of Hormuz with a width of only 34 km is one of the most strategic waterways of the world, through which the world's 60 percent crude oil supplies pass. Hormuz Strait connects the Persian Gulf to the Gulf of Oman and the international waters. Some 200 square km of the northern coast of Qeshm island is covered with the Hara marine forests that abound in the Persian Gulf and are considered Iran's protected areas due to their special ecological and environmental features.



Qeshm Island, which has a 300 square km free trade zone, attracts businessmen from all over Iran and from other parts of the world. Many major industries and plants have been established with foreign collaboration, and an international airport is being built. It has got excellent port facilities and lies 60 km from the Omani port of Khosab, and 180 km from the UAE. It has a land surface of 1491 km and has 59 towns and villages. The average temperature of Qeshm Island is approximately 27 degrees Celsius. The warmest months are June through August and the coldest from October to January. The average rainfall is 183.2mm. About 1.5 percent of the world birds and 25 percent of Iran's native birds annually migrate to the Hara forests of Qeshm, which are classified as national park.

An ancient Portuguese castle, historic mosques, Seyyed Mozaffar and Bibi Maryam shrines, various ponds and mangrove forests are among the tourism attractions in the island, which seems to float in the azure waters of the Persian Gulf. Several domes, salty caves, the preserved area in Shibderaz Village where turtles hatch, as well as numerous ports and wharfs are among the tourist potentials of the island. Fishing is a leading occupation practiced by the inhabitants of the island, who also grow dates and melons. Salt is mined on the southeastern coast. The population of Qeshm Island is about 200,000. Nowadays, Qeshm attracts thousands of tourists every year due to its natural beauties and modern malls. There are nice hotels and motels in the island. The Hara sea-forest, which thrives on saline waters, and where trees grow to a maximum of 6 meters, is one of the most beautiful attractions of Qeshm.

The waters of Kargeh Spring are relatively warm and have sulfuric elements, which explain for their unpleasant smell. Nevertheless, the waters of Kargeh Spring have healing effects, and the local people use the water and mud of the spring to treat several skin diseases and muscular pains. The sea waters around Qeshm have as much as 1000 types of fish and other marine creatures. So far 170 types of local and migratory birds have been identified on this island including pelicans, flamingos, eagles, and a variety of sparrows. This invaluable treasure of marine and bird life has made Qeshm a key destination for the world's tourists and nature enthusiasts.

However, the natural beauties of Qeshm are not limited to what we mentioned in our today's program. We will leave the rest of our discourse on Qeshm for our next week's program. Until then, then it is goodbye and God bless you all.

http://english.irib.ir/radioculture/ira ... shm-island


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Re: Qeshm Island (Gheshm island)

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Feb 02, 2014 4:57 am

Qeshm Island (In Persian Gulf)
By: Daniel T. Potts

Qeshm Island (per. Jazira-ye Qešm)is the largest island (ca. 122 km long, 18 km wide on average, 1,445 sq km) in the Persian Gulf, about 22 km south of Bandar-e 'Abbâs (q.v.). Separated from the mainland by the straits of Khurân (Clarence Strait), Qeshm runs virtually parallel to the Persian coast between Bandar-e 'Abbâs in the east and Bandar-(e) Lenga in the west (Sailing directions for the Persian Gulf, p. 123; Handbuch des Persischen Golfs, p. 155).


Qeshm Island in Persian Gulf - Satellite images are courtesy of NASA

The toponomy of the island has varied greatly over time. Nearchus referred to an island near the mouth of the Persian Gulf as Oaracta (e.g., Geog. 16.3.7; Pliny, Natural History 6.98), where, in Arrian's account, Nearchus was shown the tomb of Erythras (Goukowsky, p. 120), after whom the Erythraean Sea was thought to have been named (Arrian, Indica 27; cf. Oracta, Ooracta, Doracta). Portuguese sources refer to the island as Queiximi/ Queixome /Queixume (Tomaschek, p. 48; cf. Quesomo in Jean de Thevenot, and the Kichmichs of Sir John Chardin [Curzon, II, p. 410]), in which we easily recognize Qeshm. They also mention Broco/Boroch/Beroho/Brocto (Tomaschek, p. 48), which scholars have long (e.g., d'Anville, p. 149; Stein) identified with Greek Oaracta. (Curzon, II, p. 410, noted a village called "Brukth/Urukth" on Qeshm).

The Akhbâr al-Sin wa'l-Hend (851 CE) mentions the island of Abarkâwân in the eastern Persian Gulf, between Sirâf and Muscat (Sauvaget, p. 7). This is identical to the island of Bani Kâwân, assigned by Abu Eshâq Estakhri to the district of Ardašir-khorra (q.v.; Estakhri, pp. 106-7), also known to Estakhri, Mas'udi and Ebn Hawqal as Lâft, (Schwarz, p. 82, n. 13). For Yâqut (Schwarz, p. 83) the isles of Kâwân and Lâft (or Lâfet) were one and the same; and L@âft survives as the name of the second largest town, historically, on Qeshm (Curzon, II, p. 411). According to Balâdori, Abarkâwân/Qeshm was reckoned part of Kermân, rather than Fârs, prior to the Islamic conquest, a point made plausible by the fact that when 'Othmân b. al-'As landed there at the beginning of the Islamic conquest, he encountered a margrave of Kermân (Schwarz, p. 83). Later lexicographers explained Abarkâwân as a corruption of Jazira-ye gâvân, (cow island); this is a folk etymology, which is reflected in Tabari's story of a commander in Khorasan who accused his soldiers of having ridden only cattle and donkeys on the isle of Banu Kâwân before he had turned them into competent cavalrymen (Schwarz, p. 83). Ebn Khordâdbeh identified the island of Banu Kâwân as a station between Kish and Hormuz on the sea-route to India and China and described its inhabitants as belonging to the 'Ebâdi sect (Sprenger, p. 79; Schwarz, p. 83).

In 1301, the ruler of Hormuz, Bahâ'-al-Din Ayâz, moved his court and a large portion of his population to Qeshm following a Tartar attack (Piacentini, p. 112; Wilson, p. 104). From this period onward the island was an important dependency of the Kingdom of Hormuz, often providing drinking water to Hormuz itself (Steensgaard, pp. 195, 297). When the king of Hormuz, QotÂb-al-Din Tahamtan III Firuz Shah, abdicated in favor of his son, Saif-al-Din (1417-1436) in 1417, he retired to Qeshm (Piacentini, p. 99). Qeshm's status as a major Hormuzi mercantile center is shown by the fact that, in late September1552, the Turkish commander Piri Re'is raided it, seizing "a great quantity of goods, of gold and silver, and of cash ... the richest prize that could be found in all the world," according to a contemporary account (Özbaran, p. 81; Ökte, p. 157).

In January 1619, Ruy Freire de Andrade left Lisbon for the Persian Gulf with orders to disperse the English, who had established a factory at Jâsk in 1616 (Boxer, p. 58), and to put pressure on the Persians, in part by dislodging the Persian garrison on Qeshm and building a Portuguese fort there (Boxer, p. 71; Slot, p. 107; Steensgaard, p. 312). Two thousand Portuguese soldiers, supported by 1,000 Hormuzi troops, landed on 7 May 1621. They drove off the Persians; and over the next five and a half months, they constructed a strong fort (Boxer, p. 72). Beginning in the winter of 1621/22, however, Emâm-qoli Khan of Shiraz for nine months blockaded the Portuguese garrison (but not their flotilla), under the command of Ruy Freire, in their recently constructed fort on Qeshm. His intention was to cut off water and supplies for Hormuz, the real object of the attack (Wilson, p. 144). The timely arrival at Jâsk on 24 December 1621 of an English East India Company squadron, due to collect silk for export, provided Emâm-qoli Khan with willing partners to assist in the expulsion of the Portuguese, in return for sole English custody over the castle of Hormuz, among other things (Boxer, p. 74). On 2 February 1622 five English guns were landed; and after fruitless negotiations between Ruy Freire and Edward Monnox, the English bombarded the fort. The garrison surrendered; Ruy Freire was sent off as prisoner in the Lion to Surat; and a Persian force was installed on the island (Boxer, pp. 77-78). The Arctic navigator, William Baffin, was killed in this action (Wilson, p. 146).

Turning their attention to Hormuz, the Persians offered the Portuguese commander there Qeshm in return for 500,000 patacas and the port of Jolfâr on the Arabian coast; but the offer was rejected, and within a few months Hormuz itself was lost to the Persian and English forces (Slot, p. 116). The Persian position on Qeshm, however, was tenuous. During the winter of 1629/30 the island was raided by a large Portuguese force; and Portuguese trade revived, so much so that the Persians agreed to pay tribute to the Portuguese in return for continued use of Qeshm (Slot, p. 134). The death of Shah 'Abbâs, however, followed by the execution of Emâm-qoli Khan, put an end to these payments (Boxer, p. 144). Meanwhile, the Dutch were experiencing difficulties negotiating a trade agreement with the Persians, and in 1645 they attacked the Persian garrison on Qeshm (Wilson, p. 164; Slot, p. 151). Although unable to take the fort, the Dutch nevertheless succeeded in pressuring the Shah; and their trading position improved markedly. As late as 1673 however, the Portuguese continued to press their claims for tribute from the Persians for use of Qeshm (Slot, p. 204). Nevertheless, Qeshm would once again fall prey to the Dutch. As their trade in the late 1670s and early 1680s became increasingly unprofitable under existing conditions, the Dutch sent a squadron to Bandar-e 'Abbâs under Casembroot, who in 1683 captured Qeshm and its Persian garrison (Slot, p. 207).

Meanwhile, the expansion of Oman led to war with Persia. Dutch records attest to Omani attacks on Qeshm in 1712 and 1717, when the island was overrun (Slot, pp. 235, 237). Even the Portuguese, assisting the Persians in 1719, could not nullify the burgeoning Omani naval power (Slot, p. 243). A treaty between Oman and Persia stipulated the return of Qeshm to Persian control in return for a berth on the island for use as a naval repair yard (Slot, p. 244).

About this time, Sheikh Rašid, an Arab sheikh based at Bâsidu in western Qeshm, began to exert his influence by making Bâsidu an attractive center for trade and attempting to secure the office of š "governor of the port" in several of the mainland Persian ports (Slot, p. 252). By 1726, however, English traders accused Arab vessels cruising off Qeshm of attacking English shipping; they began boycotting Bâsidu even as they asserted the right to control all sea trade in the region (Slot, p. 262). The following year, Afghan forces pushed south to Bandar-e 'Abbâs, but Sheikh Rašid successfully negotiated peace, in return for hefty tribute, with the Afghan šahbandar Sayyed 'Ali (Slot, p. 263). Shortly thereafter, Sheikh Rašid was imprisoned by Zabardast Khan, the Afghan general, and Bâsidu was sacked. A sizable payment secured his release in February 1728; and now the English, having quarreled with Sayyed 'Ali, threatened to abandon Bandar-e 'Abbâs in favor of Bâsidu (Slot, p. 264). It was the Portuguese, however, who reappeared in 1729, seizing the customs house at Bâsidu and ransacking Sheikh Rašid's belongings, but by the following year the Portuguese were gone. Sheikh Rašid returned to Bâsidu, and the English remained in control of Qeshm (Slot, p. 266). Anxious to assist the Afghans at the expense of their Dutch trading rivals, the English willingly landed an Afghan force on Qeshm (Slot, p. 268). Early in 1729 an uprising was staged against the Afghans by the local population, and the English and Dutch failed to come to any agreement over the fate of Qeshm. In the end, Sheikh ˆabona, a pro-Afghan Arab living in eastern Qeshm, seized control of the island, decapitated some of the rebels, and sent the heads to Bandar-e 'Abbâs (Slot, p. 271). Afghan defeats in Persia created instability, however; and later in the same year 'Abd-Allâh b. Mas'ud, wakil of Muscat, raided Qeshm (Slot, p. 271). Meanwhile, Sheikh Rašid of Bâsidu supported the restoration of Shah Tahmâsp II; but when the Afghans were eventually routed, Rašid found himself blamed by Tahmâsp-qoli Khan's (Nâder Shah) English and Dutch allies for the escape of the Afghan forces to Arabia. The English arrested him, and the Dutch seized his ship; but intervention by Mirzâ Taqi, ex-governor of Shiraz and aide to Tahmâsp-qoli Khan, effected his release and return to Bâsidu (Slot, pp. 280-81).

In 1741, as part of his wars on Oman, Nadir Shah order his governor in Bandar-e 'Abbâs to restore the fort on Qeshm (Slot, p. 315); but in 1755, eight years after Nâder Shah's assassination, his naval commander, Mollâ 'Ali-ˆah, supported by Qawâsem Arabs from the other side of the Persian Gulf, seized Qeshm from the Ma'in tribe, who then controlled it (Al-Qasimi, 1986, p. 26). Lâft was taken by the Sheikh of Ras al-Khaimah in 1756 (Slot, p. 25); and Qeshm effectively fell under Qawâsem control, strengthened in 1777 by the marriage of the Qawâsim Sheikh Saqr b. Rašid to the daughter of the Banu Ma'in chief (Al-Qasimi, 1986, p. 26). In 1793, however, Sayyed Soltân, the Imam of Muscat, occupied Qeshm and Hormuz (Badger, p. lvi), and struck a deal with the Persians which gave him control over Bandar-e 'Abbâs and its dependencies from Jâsk to Bandar-e Lenga (Oppenheim, p. 343). When the East India Company representative, John Malcolm, arrived in 1800 on a mission to bolster English trade in the region (Al-Rashid, p. 48; Al-Qasimi, 1986, p. 38), he found Qeshm under the control of a local Sheikh named Mollâ Hosayn, who paid tribute to the Imam of Muscat (cf. Kinneir, p. 14). Malcolm's report to the Earl of Mornington, dated 26 February 1800, singled out Qeshm as the ideal location for a trading base (Al-Qasimi, 1994, p. 14). Suspicions that the Banu Ma'in were in league with Muscat's enemies, the Qawâsem, led to an attack on Qeshm in 1806 by the Omanis, by now staunch allies of the English, and the restoration of the tributary relationship (Al-Qasimi, 1986, pp. 84-85). In spite of a treaty, Mollâ Hosayn was seized by Omani forces in 1807; and the East India Company's ship Alert sent to take possession of Qeshm. A Qawâsem counter-action led by Sheikh Soltân b. Saqr, however, succeeded in commandeering the fort on Qeshm and resisting the English assault (Al-Qasimi, 1986, p. 85). A year later John Malcolm entered into fruitless negotiations with Fath-'Ali Shah, seeking control of Qeshm, Hengâm, and Khârg for the East India Company. In 1809-10, as a reaction to the seizure of the Minerva in 1808 (Al-Qasimi, 1986, pp. 92 ff.), the Bombay Marine sailed to Qeshm in HMS Chiffonne on the pretext of expelling the Qawâsem 'pirates' (Horsburgh, p. 257). The inhabitants surrendered peacefully, and the island reverted to the Imam of Muscat (Wilson, p. 205). Ten years later Qeshm was the rendezvous point for a joint force, composed of the Bombay Marine, under the command of Major-General Sir William Grant Keir, and Sayyed Sa'id, the Sultan of Muscat (Wilson, p. 207), that effectively put an end to Arab competition in the Persian Gulf trade. As a result of the General Treaty of Peace signed on 8 January 1820, Bâsidu, called Bassadore in English accounts of the time (e.g., Danvers, p. 404) became the base of operations for the Bombay Marine (renamed the Indian Navy in 1830) in the Persian Gulf (Curzon, II, p. 411; Wilson, p. 208) until 1863 (Tuson, p. 8); and a hospital and other facilities were erected there (Whitelock, p. 178; Lorimer, IIA, p. 267). A detachment of sepoys was stationed at Bâsidu until 1879 (Curzon, II, p. 412), but by the late 19th century the British presence was reduced to a coal depot supervised by a Native Agent "responsible for the flag" (Lorimer, IIA, p. 267). In 1911/1912 the coaling depot was moved from Bâsidu to Henjâm (Tuson, 1979, p. 9). The population at the time was overwhelmingly Arab and was governed by a local sheikh, who was subordinate to the Persian authorities (Lorimer, IIB, p. 1558).

The natural resources of Qeshm include salt (the purest in the Persian Gulf [Pilgrim, p. 129]), naphtha, and firewood. In the 1860s Qeshm exported blocks of salt to Muscat for re-export to Calcutta and east Africa; supplied "the whole circuit of the Persian Gulf with firewood"; and was still farmed on behalf of the Sultan of Muscat (Pelly, p. 266). It was no longer a major trading station, however, and went unmentioned in an official Dutch report on Persian Gulf trade in 1886 (Keun de Hoogerwoerd). In 1935 the British coaling station was abandoned at the request of Reza Shah (Kelly, p. 183).

In 1989 the Qeshm Free Area Authority was established with the goal of attracting substantial infrastructure investment to expand industrial, banking and tourist facilities. With a population of around 85,000, Qeshm now has four designated industrial areas, half a dozen large towns, and over 50 villages. Qeshm is located in the midst of two of Iran's largest natural gas fields. - See more at: http://iranchamber.com/geography/articl ... TiK1k.dpuf



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Re: Qeshm Island (Gheshm island)

Postby Cherie Boyce » Sat Feb 15, 2014 11:21 am

As a traveler i am happy to read about Qeshm Island, I am already watched a documentary of Dolphin and some other water animal which is make in Qeshm Island's water and beach. I know Qeshm is a island situated in the Strait of Hormuz, and separated from the mainland by the Clarence Strait/Khuran in the Persian Gulf. Island is good but i don't able to see anything which attract peoples for visit. this is a simple Island with simple look and ordinary peoples.
I enjoying when i go indianapolis to nyc in bus with http://www.getbusticket.com/indianapolis-to-new-york.html
I always booked my ticket in advance online.
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Re: Qeshm Island (Gheshm island)

Postby Parvaneh » Sat Feb 15, 2014 3:24 pm

Cherie Boyce wrote:As a traveler i am happy to read about Qeshm Island, I am already watched a documentary of Dolphin and some other water animal which is make in Qeshm Island's water and beach. I know Qeshm is a island situated in the Strait of Hormuz, and separated from the mainland by the Clarence Strait/Khuran in the Persian Gulf. Island is good but i don't able to see anything which attract peoples for visit. this is a simple Island with simple look and ordinary peoples.


please see the below link and You will definitely change your opinion :)
viewtopic.php?f=37&t=1649&p=2781
viewtopic.php?f=45&t=1051&p=1825
http://www.qeshmecotourism.com
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Re: Qeshm Island (Gheshm island)

Postby Cherie Boyce » Mon Feb 17, 2014 11:18 am

I really appreciate your this effort. Its all are very Informative for me, these all three link increase such a many good point in my knowledge.
I think Qeshm Island's weather is hot then other Iran's detestation. Is it good for march visit ?
I enjoying when i go indianapolis to nyc in bus with http://www.getbusticket.com/indianapolis-to-new-york.html
I always booked my ticket in advance online.
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Re: Qeshm Island (Gheshm island)

Postby Fatemeh_abdi » Tue Feb 18, 2014 6:47 am

Cherie Boyce wrote:I really appreciate your this effort. Its all are very Informative for me, these all three link increase such a many good point in my knowledge.
I think Qeshm Island's weather is hot then other Iran's detestation. Is it good for march visit ?

Actually, It is the best time to visit the island on March ,not hot and not cold, like spring.
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Re: Qeshm Island (Gheshm island)

Postby Cherie Boyce » Fri Feb 21, 2014 9:47 am

@Fatemeh_abdi

Thank you Fatemeh_abdi, Are you from Iran ?
If i am visiting Qeshm Island is it possible i will visit every thing in one day ?
beacouse my trip will very short.
I enjoying when i go indianapolis to nyc in bus with http://www.getbusticket.com/indianapolis-to-new-york.html
I always booked my ticket in advance online.
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Re: Qeshm Island (Gheshm island)

Postby Fatemeh_abdi » Fri Feb 21, 2014 7:53 pm

Cherie Boyce wrote:@Fatemeh_abdi

Thank you Fatemeh_abdi, Are you from Iran ?
If i am visiting Qeshm Island is it possible i will visit every thing in one day ?
beacouse my trip will very short.

I'm from Iran and I've visited Gheshm island twice.
I think you need to spend two days to visit everything there but if it's impossible, you can visit some of them, just the important and interesting ones.
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