-->
-->

Tehran

Tehran

Postby Parvaneh » Tue Feb 11, 2014 8:31 pm

Introduction:Tehran (Persian:تهران )

Tehran
"Tehran Bozorg" in Persian; The capital of Iran

Azadi Square, Tehran, Iran Tehran Bozorg (Greater Tehran), the capital of the Islamic Republic of Iran and center of Tehran Province as well. Tehran is one of the largest metropolitans of the world, and it is the country's largest economic center and the base for its large and small modern technological and industrial establishments. Located on the slopes of the mountains and at the foot of the magnificent Mount Damavand, it has been the country's capital city for over 200 years now. Nearly 14 Million people live in Tehran in contrast to two hundred thousand in 1920.

The first mention of Tehran in an old geographical text is made in the 10th century Massalek-al Mamalek (The Ways of States) by Estakhri. It was just a village before the Safavid era.

By the Mongols' invasion and the consequent severe devastation the city of Rey received, most of the Rey's people took refuge to this village.

This was a starting point for growth of Tehran, and gradually this village that was famous for its fine fruits and beautiful gardens, underwent new developments. Shah Tahmasb, one of the Safavid kings, chose Tehran as administrative center for the Safavid dinastry, which resulted in constructing many big governmental buildings, castles and gates.

At the time of the Zand dynasty, it was a small town that was significant from a military point of view. The first of the Qajar kings, Agha Mohammed Khan, named Tehran as the country's capital in 1778. Nevertheless, the capital's development started at the time of another Qajar monarch, Fath-Ali Shah. The citadel, which Agha Mohammed Khan had built, was developed to include the new royal buildings.

At the same time, the city's population was redoubled. With the increasing importance of the city, soon gates, squares and mosques were built and it was at the time of Nassereddin Shah that the city's master plan was prepared and modern streets were formed. Later, large central squares like Toopkhaneh (now Imam Khomeini) square and several military buildings were constructed. With the decline of the Qajar dynasty, Tehran soon took the shape of a modern city. The construction of large government buildings, new streets, recreation centers, urban service establishments, and academic and scientific centers were started, while most of the old gates and buildings were destroyed and the city's old architectural fabric replaced by a modern one.


A view of Tehran with Alborz mountains on the back With an altitude of 1200 meters above sea level, Tehran is a city of all four seasons with hot summers, freezing winters, and brief springs and autumns. The highest recorded summer temperature in Tehran has been 42 degrees centigrade while the lowest has been registered at 8 degrees below zero.

Tehran is pleasant, it derives its originality from its dry climate, always cool in the evening, the nearness of the mountains, its numerous parks and gardens where flowers blossom throughout the year, the alleys of trees in the avenues or even smaller streets, the water which runs down from the upper city along deep and wide gutters which look like small rivers during spring.

Dams of Karaj, Latian and Lar supply Tehran's drinking water and parts of the country's electrical power. These dam-lakes and river-sides provide also valuable tourism sites for visiting and enjoying walking and viewing beautiful natural sites as well as practicing various kinds of sports, including water sports. There are dozen of small coffee-houses with zinc roofs nestle among the bushes. Mountain streams run among the tables. But everyone does not sit around a table; many of the customers prefer the ancient-style comfort of low divans covered with old carpets. Delicious "kababs" are consumed, and hot teas are served from "Samawar".


Golestan Palace, Qajar era The Alborz range on the north of Tehran, which host the highest peak in the country during winter provides a very suitable climate for ski lovers. In winter, the mountain hotels and ski-clubs at Shemshak, Shahrestanak and Dizine are full several days a week. Some expert skiers consider the snow quality in northern Tehran to be one of the best in the world.

The highest peak in the country, Mount Damavand (5,678 m), which is an extinct volcano covered in snow for most of the year with its visibility from Tehran has an attractive appeal for adventurers and climbers.

The Golestan (Rose Garden) Palace is one of most visited places in Tehran, which was the Qajars' royal residence. Its garden is an oasis of coolness and silence in the heart of the city. The main building, architecturally unpretentious, houses a museum with objects from the Qajar period in the overloaded and pompous style of last century. In the Golestan garden, a one-story pavilion to the right and slightly behind the entrance, shelters one of the best organized museums in Tehran. It contains about thirty showcases presenting everything, which makes up the basic originality of Iranian life in the various provinces of the country.
- See more at: http://iranchamber.com/cities/tehran/te ... sYPxf.dpuf


-------------------------------------------------



Location: Tehran City, Tehran province

Days of trip: (Without air plane) 1 Days from Tehran to Tehran
Attention: In holidays there is heavy traffic in all roads around Tehran.

Best time to visit: No Limit

Daily time visit:

Difficulty level: Easy

Requirements: (Depend on your plan) Guide or GPS track...

Legal permission need: No

-------------------------------------------------




Hotel: Yes

Shop: Yes

Gasoline: Yes


-------------------------------------------------


How to get there:



Nearest airport: Tehran airport

Nearest train station: Tehran Station

-------------------------------------------------



Location on map:




Picture:

Tajrish
Image

Image

Image


Image




Milad Tower-Borj-e Milad
Image

Image

Image




The Golstan Palace
Image

Image

Image






Also see:

viewtopic.php?f=13&t=874
viewtopic.php?f=13&t=881
viewtopic.php?f=13&t=1213
viewtopic.php?f=37&t=1641&p=2742
viewtopic.php?f=13&t=868&p=2739
viewtopic.php?f=13&t=495&p=3047#p3047
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Tehran: Largest West Asian City

Postby Parvaneh » Wed Feb 12, 2014 6:47 am

Tehran: Largest West Asian City

Most people visit Tehran at the beginning of their travel to Iran, as a majority of international flights to Iran land at Imam Khomeini International Airport, 30 km south of the city.

The capital of Iran is the largest city in West Asia and the fifth largest globally.

A visit to its tourist attractions is highly recommended, DestinationIran reported.

Tehran is situated on a slope that goes up to the very north of Tehran, making it a very favorable place to live since its temperature is always cooler than in the south of the city by a few degrees.

Compared to the other parts of the country, Tehran has a relatively moderate temperature, though its12.5 million population suffer from heavy road traffic and high air pollution.

Tehran is the most populated city of Iran.

History

The region of Tehran has been historically known as Rey, which is currently used to refer to a county in southern Tehran.

Its history dates back to 6000 BC and has been the capital of Medes.

Today, you find several tourist attractions in this part of Tehran. Rey was destroyed by Arabs in the 7th century and Mongols in the 14th. So, its inhabitants fled to present-day Tehran, at the time of Mongol invasion.

Tehran began to prosper since then. With the rise of Qajars, Tehran became important when it was declared as the capital in 1795.

Palaces were built and continued to be built under the next dynasty, the Pahlavid. After the monarchy fell apart in Iran as a result of the Islamic Revolution in 1979, Tehran maintained its significance as the capital of Iran.

International travelers visiting Iran have found the following sights and museums most interesting:

Niavaran Palace

Niavaran Palace is a historical complex situated in the northern part of Tehran. It consists of several buildings and a museum.

The Sahebqaraniyeh Palace, from the time of Nasereddin Shah of Qajar Dynasty, is also inside this complex.

The main Niavaran Palace, completed in 1968, was the primary residence of the last shah, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, until the Islamic Revolution. The main palace was designed by Iranian architect, Mohsen Foroughi.

Treasury of National Jewels

The extraordinary collection of gemstones and jewelry at this place is a breathtaking must-see that is housed by the Central Bank of Iran. The history behind each piece is interesting.

One cannot put any price on this collection and cannot find anything similar to this in the world. When you visit Tehran, make sure you have a look at this collection.

Golestan Palace

Golestan Palace pronounced “Kakheh Golestan” is the former royal Qajar complex in Tehran. The oldest of the historical monuments in Tehran, Golestan Palace (meaning Rose Garden Palace) belongs to a group of royal buildings that were once enclosed within the mud-thatched walls of Tehran’s Arg (citadel).

This is the first set of palaces originally built at the end of the Safavid rule in a garden situated in central Tehran close to its grand bazaar.

Bastan and Abgineh Museums

Bastan (National) and Abgineh (Glass) museums hold some of the most attractive pre-Islam items in one building and post-Islam items in another. Every piece is accompanied by details related to archeology, place of discovery and other details.

Abgineh exhibits ceramics and glassware. It has a fantastic set of items beautifully displayed and showcased, indicating the delicacy of Iranian skills in crafting these items.

For those interested in exploring the origins of urban settlement and historical monuments at places other than museums, Tehran offers the following tourist attractions:



Toghrol Tower

Toghrol Tower is a 12th-century monument located in Rey City. The tower is near Rashkan Castle. The 20-meter-tall brick tower is the tomb of Seljuk ruler Toghrol Beg, who died in Rey in 1063.

Originally, like other monuments of its time, it was capped by a conical dome, which would have added to its height. The dome collapsed during an earthquake.

The exterior design is that of a polygon with 24 angles, which is thought to contribute to the structure’s stability against tremors.

The tower is protected by Iran’s Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts and Tourism Organization.

(Source: Iran Daily)


Sa'dabad Palace
Image

Image

Image

Image


Moghadam Museum of Tehran
Image

Image

Image
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Tehran tourist spots

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:54 am

Often overlooked in favor of the glorious tourist attractions of Isfahan, Shiraz and Persepolis, Tehran has numerous draws of its own to keep visitors busy.


According to Iran Daily, Its tourist spots are spread wide, from the riverside cafes and modern high-rises climbing the slopes of the Alborz in the north to the sprawling suburbs of the conservative south, and from the Old World atmosphere of its grand bazaar to the grandeur of Golestan and the National Jewel Museum.
Tehran offers tourists a little bit of everything, including the best place in which to feel the pulse of modern Iran, Traveltips reported.

Golestan Palace
Golestan Palace is set in Arg Square in central Tehran and housed within the walls of Tehran’s historic citadel. It reflects the affluent decadence of Qajar Dynasty (1794-1925), having served as their court and official residence.
After the fall of the Qajars, the palace was used by the Pahlavis as a reception and is now a assortment of museums open to the public.
Favorite buildings within the palace complex include Talar-e Aineh (Hall of Mirrors), Shams-ol-Emareh (Edifice of the Sun), Talar-e Aj (Ivory Hall), Talar-e Almas (Hall of Diamonds) and four Badgirs (wind towers) designed to cool the interior.

Museums
The Treasury of National Jewels, also called the National Jewel Museum, houses the most impressive jewelry collection in the world.
Although the museum is housed beneath Bank Melli in central Tehran, just a short hop north of the bazaar, it is owned by the Central Bank of Iran, its jewels serving as a backup for its currency.
Dazzling displays include a nearly 80-pound globe of pure gold decked with 51,366 pieces of jewelry.
The treasury only opens three days a week from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Among Tehran’s other noteworthy museums are the Air Force Museum near Azadi Square, the Coin Museum on Khomeini Avenue, Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art to the south of the Carpet Museum, and the Film Museum, housed in an old Qajar mansion off Vali Asr Avenue.
Although the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art’s website is something of a work in progress for English-speaking visitors, the museum is itself a work of Iranian art.
Designed in the traditional dun-brick style, its structure is meant to evoke a sense of tradition against which to interpret its collection of modern art.

Freedom (Azadi) Monument
Freedom Monument, also called Azadi Monument, is arguably Tehran’s most recognizable modern symbol, rising from the middle of Azadi Square.
Designed by architect Hossein Amanat, it was built at the end of the shah’s reign, reflecting Islamic and Sassanid architectural styles.
The monument has become a focal point for national gatherings and political demonstrations in more recent times.

Tehran Bazaar

One of the greatest marketplaces in all of Iran, Tehran bazaar is a giant labyrinth of narrow alleys teeming with shoppers, merchants and overladen carts.
The bazaar houses a number of impressive mosques, most notably Imam Khomeini Mosque, as well as dozens of covered walkways and specialized sections for everything from copper to carpets, spices and other items of daily necessities.
It is the best place in town to bargain for a wide array of souvenirs, while the conservative merchants often provide travelers their closest peek into life on the southern side of the city.
Unless you’re prepared to face the bazaar’s daunting rush hour crowds, get your shopping done either in the morning or between lunch and about 5 p.m.
Also, a trip to Tehran isn’t complete without experiencing a traditional market.
Most neighborhoods have small bazaars throughout the week, but Tehran’s largest is the Jomeh Bazaar, or Friday Market.
From the outside, the three-story parking garage, the market may not look like much, but this is just a modern and impromptu setting for a classic haggler’s paradise.
Search through the hundreds of vendor stalls to find hidden treasures, from musical instruments to ornamental swords.

Milad Tower

Milad Tower is the tallest tower in Iran.
Built in 2007 in Tehran, it stands 435 meters high. The head consists of a large pod with 12 floors, the roof of which is at 315 meters. Below this is a staircase and elevators to reach the area.
Milad Tower is the sixth tallest tower in the world after the Guangzhou TV and Sightseeing Tower in Guangzhou, CN Tower in Toronto, Ostankino Tower in Moscow, Oriental Pearl Tower in Shanghai and the Tokyo Skytree. It is also currently (in early 2010) the 14th tallest freestanding structure in the world.
Part of the Tehran International Trade and Convention Center, Milad telecommunication tower has restaurants at the top that offer a panoramic view of Tehran, a five-star hotel, a convention center, a world trade center and an IT park, Tehranmiladtower reported.
The tower is in fact a complex that seeks to respond to the needs of business in the globalized world in the 21st century by offering facilities combining trade, information, communication, convention and accommodation all in one place.
Furthermore, the complex features a parking area of 27,000 square meters, a large computer and telecommunications unit, a cultural and scientific unit, a commercial transaction center, a showroom for exhibiting products, a specialized library, an exhibition hall and an administrative unit.
Milad Tower has an octagonal base that symbolizes traditional Persian architecture.
There are many other sightseeing spots, including shrines, parks, palaces and museums, in Tehran that appeal to tourists


http://english.irib.ir/radioculture/ira ... rist-spots
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Tehran tourist spots

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:54 am

Often overlooked in favor of the glorious tourist attractions of Isfahan, Shiraz and Persepolis, Tehran has numerous draws of its own to keep visitors busy.


According to Iran Daily, Its tourist spots are spread wide, from the riverside cafes and modern high-rises climbing the slopes of the Alborz in the north to the sprawling suburbs of the conservative south, and from the Old World atmosphere of its grand bazaar to the grandeur of Golestan and the National Jewel Museum.
Tehran offers tourists a little bit of everything, including the best place in which to feel the pulse of modern Iran, Traveltips reported.

Golestan Palace
Golestan Palace is set in Arg Square in central Tehran and housed within the walls of Tehran’s historic citadel. It reflects the affluent decadence of Qajar Dynasty (1794-1925), having served as their court and official residence.
After the fall of the Qajars, the palace was used by the Pahlavis as a reception and is now a assortment of museums open to the public.
Favorite buildings within the palace complex include Talar-e Aineh (Hall of Mirrors), Shams-ol-Emareh (Edifice of the Sun), Talar-e Aj (Ivory Hall), Talar-e Almas (Hall of Diamonds) and four Badgirs (wind towers) designed to cool the interior.

Museums
The Treasury of National Jewels, also called the National Jewel Museum, houses the most impressive jewelry collection in the world.
Although the museum is housed beneath Bank Melli in central Tehran, just a short hop north of the bazaar, it is owned by the Central Bank of Iran, its jewels serving as a backup for its currency.
Dazzling displays include a nearly 80-pound globe of pure gold decked with 51,366 pieces of jewelry.
The treasury only opens three days a week from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Among Tehran’s other noteworthy museums are the Air Force Museum near Azadi Square, the Coin Museum on Khomeini Avenue, Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art to the south of the Carpet Museum, and the Film Museum, housed in an old Qajar mansion off Vali Asr Avenue.
Although the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art’s website is something of a work in progress for English-speaking visitors, the museum is itself a work of Iranian art.
Designed in the traditional dun-brick style, its structure is meant to evoke a sense of tradition against which to interpret its collection of modern art.

Freedom (Azadi) Monument
Freedom Monument, also called Azadi Monument, is arguably Tehran’s most recognizable modern symbol, rising from the middle of Azadi Square.
Designed by architect Hossein Amanat, it was built at the end of the shah’s reign, reflecting Islamic and Sassanid architectural styles.
The monument has become a focal point for national gatherings and political demonstrations in more recent times.

Tehran Bazaar

One of the greatest marketplaces in all of Iran, Tehran bazaar is a giant labyrinth of narrow alleys teeming with shoppers, merchants and overladen carts.
The bazaar houses a number of impressive mosques, most notably Imam Khomeini Mosque, as well as dozens of covered walkways and specialized sections for everything from copper to carpets, spices and other items of daily necessities.
It is the best place in town to bargain for a wide array of souvenirs, while the conservative merchants often provide travelers their closest peek into life on the southern side of the city.
Unless you’re prepared to face the bazaar’s daunting rush hour crowds, get your shopping done either in the morning or between lunch and about 5 p.m.
Also, a trip to Tehran isn’t complete without experiencing a traditional market.
Most neighborhoods have small bazaars throughout the week, but Tehran’s largest is the Jomeh Bazaar, or Friday Market.
From the outside, the three-story parking garage, the market may not look like much, but this is just a modern and impromptu setting for a classic haggler’s paradise.
Search through the hundreds of vendor stalls to find hidden treasures, from musical instruments to ornamental swords.

Milad Tower

Milad Tower is the tallest tower in Iran.
Built in 2007 in Tehran, it stands 435 meters high. The head consists of a large pod with 12 floors, the roof of which is at 315 meters. Below this is a staircase and elevators to reach the area.
Milad Tower is the sixth tallest tower in the world after the Guangzhou TV and Sightseeing Tower in Guangzhou, CN Tower in Toronto, Ostankino Tower in Moscow, Oriental Pearl Tower in Shanghai and the Tokyo Skytree. It is also currently (in early 2010) the 14th tallest freestanding structure in the world.
Part of the Tehran International Trade and Convention Center, Milad telecommunication tower has restaurants at the top that offer a panoramic view of Tehran, a five-star hotel, a convention center, a world trade center and an IT park, Tehranmiladtower reported.
The tower is in fact a complex that seeks to respond to the needs of business in the globalized world in the 21st century by offering facilities combining trade, information, communication, convention and accommodation all in one place.
Furthermore, the complex features a parking area of 27,000 square meters, a large computer and telecommunications unit, a cultural and scientific unit, a commercial transaction center, a showroom for exhibiting products, a specialized library, an exhibition hall and an administrative unit.
Milad Tower has an octagonal base that symbolizes traditional Persian architecture.
There are many other sightseeing spots, including shrines, parks, palaces and museums, in Tehran that appeal to tourists


http://english.irib.ir/radioculture/ira ... rist-spots
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

TEHRAN, the City of Life

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:59 am

TEHRAN, the City of Life

If you come to Iran with airplane, absolutely you visit Tehran in first steep; Tehran is very big city with more than 15,000,000 populations and has very bad traffic.

According to Tehran Live website, Tehran in middle of Iran, but it is closer to north of Iran, distance from Tehran to west or east be same, for example distance between Tehran and Shiraz is 1000 km and to Esfahan is 450 km.

Tehran’s weather is pollution especially in winter, but north of Tehran has good weather in winter and summer.

Tehran don’t have long history the same as Shiraz or another history cities but you can find good museums, shop center, nice place for rest in this city. Tehran is expensive for Iranian people but for guest people is cheap, Tehran has nice night and i like it more than day. Tehran in summer is very warm and in winter is so cold because it is near Damavand Mountain, tallest mountain in Iran

http://english.irib.ir/radioculture/ira ... e%E2%80%9D
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: Tehran

Postby Parvaneh » Wed Mar 12, 2014 1:27 pm

The Glassware and Ceramic Museum of Iran
Image

Image

Image
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Map of Tehran's Metro

Postby Parvaneh » Fri Mar 14, 2014 4:43 am

Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: Tehran

Postby Parvaneh » Sat Mar 15, 2014 5:15 pm

Province of Tehran

Image

* HASC : IR.TH
* ISO : 07
* Dom : th

The province of Tehran is 18,909 km2 (7,301 sq mi) in the north of the central plateau of Iran. This province has common borders with the Mazandaran province from north, Qom province from south, Semnan province from east and Qazvin province from west. The metropolis of Tehran is not only the capital city of the province, but is also the capital of Iran. As of 2005, this province includes thirteen townships, forty-three municipalities, and 1358 villages.

The province gained importance when Tehran was claimed the capital by Agha Mohammad Khan of the Qajar Dynasty in 1778. Today Tehran ranks in the top 20 metropolitan cities of the world in size.

The province of Tehran has 12,147,543 inhabitants and is Iran's most densely populated region. Approximately 86.5% reside in urban areas and 13.5% in rural areas of the province.

Tehran is the commercial heart of Iran and has more than 17,000 industrial units which is about 26% of all units in Iran. The province contains almost 30% of Iran's economy, and comprises 40% of Iran's consumer market. The province has three hydro dams namely Latiyan, Lar, and Amir Kabir as well as two natural lakes, providing the water supply of Tehran and the province.


Elahiyeh District, The City of Tehran (anno 2004) The province contains 170 mines, over 330 square kilometers of forests, and over 12800 square kilometers of pasture. The largest rivers of this province are Karaj River and Jajrud River.

The highest point of the province is Mount Damavand at an elevation of 5,678 m, and the lowest point of the province being the plains of Varamin, 790 m above sea level.

Mountain ranges such as The Alborz span the north; Savad Kooh and Firooz Kooh are located in the north east; Lavasanat, Qarah Daq, Shemiranat, Hassan Abad and Namak Mountains are in the southern areas; Bibi Shahr Banoo and Alqadr are situated in the south east and the heights of Qasr-e-Firoozeh being located to the east of the province.

The climate of Tehran province in the southern areas is warm and dry, but in the mountain vicinity is cold and semi-humid, and in the higher regions is cold with long winters. The hottest months of the year are from mid-July to mid-September when temperatures range from 28°-35° C and the coldest months experience 7° to -5 C around December-January. Tehran city has moderate winters and hot summers. Average annual rainfall is approximately 400 mm, the maximum being during the winter season.

The regions such as the southern slopes of the Alborz Mountains, especially in the mountains, valleys, and rivers and artificial lakes formed behind the great dams of Amir Kabir, Latiyan and Lar along with natural lakes of Jaban and Tarr provide considerable recreation for the province. Moreover, due to excessive snowfall in the northern areas of the province during the winter season, the Alborz Mountains form an excellent environment for winter sports such as skiing. Dizin, Shemshak, and Tochal are the most popular skiing resorts.


Dizin Ski resort,
Alborz Mountain range, north of Tehran Mount Damavand (5,678 m),
Alborz Mountain range Toghrol Tower, Ray, Iran.
13th century, Seljuki era.

Tehran province has several archeological sites clearly indicating settlements several thousand years old. Until 300 years ago township of Ray on the south of the city of Tehran was the most prominent of the cities of the province. Tehran has over 1500 historical sites of cultural significance registered with Iran's Cultural Heritage Organization. The oldest of these in Tehran province are the remains of two sites in Firouzkuh region that date back to the 4th millennia BC.

Since the city of Tehran designated as the capital of Iran by 1778 it has rose to become the largest city and cultural, economical center of Iran as well. During the past 200 years it has been home to many reputed scholars, writers, poets and artists, both those who have lived and those who are born in Tehran.



Definitions:
* HASC : Hierarchical Administrative Subdivision Codes
* ISO : Codes from ISO 3166-2
* Dom : Province Domain codes
- See more at: http://iranchamber.com/provinces/01_teh ... tWFvu.dpuf
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Map of Tehran

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Feb 01, 2015 12:52 pm

Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: Tehran

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Feb 01, 2015 12:54 pm

Although Tehran is not Iran, but without this great metropolis, which is the focal point of Iran’s transportation network and the center in which more than 40% of the nation’s economic activities takes place, it would not be possible to fully comprehend the ever changing Iran. Tehran is the mirror of Iran. Those who inhabit this young metropolis have come from around the country with different beliefs, cultures, languages and life styles and live in a national and international context together. It can be noted that modern societies take form in large cities, and therefore, Iran’s future is being formed in Tehran.
Iran is a complicated and mysterious country and Tehran is more so. Activities, population and cultures have shaped a new and ever changing logic upon which people relate to one another without prior familiarity. This phenomenon, despite being problematic, expands and facilitates innovations and
creativity.

Tehran Coordinates

Province
Tehran
Latitude
35 40 N
Longitude 51 26 E
City
1500 km (579 sq mi)
Urban
686 km (265 sq mi)
Elevation
1200 m (3,900 ft)
Population(2006)
about 11,000,000
Density
10000/km (25,899/sq mi)
Time zone
3.5 GMT

In fact, this is a characteristic of all metropolises to instigate new dynamism. Availability and awareness of economic, social and cultural information are necessary for understanding a city. These concepts, however, make sense only when they materialize within a country, an urban space or its periphery.
Although the City of Tehran can be similar to Los Angeles or Shanghai in terms of urban planning, size, variety, internal dynamics and economic role, it cannot be understood without its territorial and cultural characteristic.
Tehran’s population increased fifty folds from 200,000 in 1900 to10.3 millions in 1996, of which 6.8 millions live within the city limits of Tehran. In the same period, however, total population of Iran increased only five folds, from 9.8 million to 60 million. Tehran, which had only a 2% share in total population, now incorporates more than 15% share. This proportion has remained relatively stable since 1970s. This population explosion is the result of migrations due to the Capital’s unique attractions. A capital that was merely a town 100 years ago has now become a more or less modern metropolis, because of governmental
centralization and improvements in social welfare. Hence, Tehran, despite its many unique aspects, is comparable with large cities such as Ankara, Brasilia, and even St. Petersburg.
Parvaneh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4429
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:11 am
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Next

Return to Cities of Iran

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests

cron