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Chaharshanbe Suri-chahar shanbe soori-Wednesday Feast-Fireworks Wednesday-Charshanbeh Soori

Chaharshanbe Suri-chahar shanbe soori-Wednesday Feast-Fireworks Wednesday-Charshanbeh Soori

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Jan 13, 2014 8:02 am

Name: Chaharshanbe Suri-chahar shanbe soori-Wednesday Feast-Fireworks Wednesday(Persian: چهارشنبه ‌سوری‎)

Description: The Chaharshanbe Suri, a fire-connected festivity!
"Give me your fiery red color/ take back my wintry sallowness." The Chaharshanbe Suri or Red Wednesday, counts among the only two extant one of those fire-connected festivities. It is an annual ritual which is held on the eve of the last Wednesday of the Iranian year.

From among the Aryan festivals and feasts, some of the most important ones pertained to fire, the symbol of good health, cultivation, light, and purity to the Iranian. Chaharshanbe-Suri, "The Red Wednesday", counts among the only two extant one of those fire-connected festivities. It is an annual ritual which is held on the eve of the last Wednesday of the Iranian year. It is believed that the ritual guarantees the dissipation of the misfortunes and evils, and of course, the materialization of people's hopes and desires for the next year.

It dates back to before the Arab Conquest of Iran; when the Iranian year was made up of 360 days with 5 extra days during which the Zoroastrians would build fires to invite their ancestors' ghosts to their homes. On the other hand, we know that the Arabs believed that Wednesday was inauspicious. So, the people shifted their ritual to the eve of Tuesday (in the Arabian calendar, a day begins and finishes at dusk) to save the custom against the ill will of the Arabs. The ritual is composed of different rites:

Bute-Afruzi (Bush-igniting)
Bush-igniting is the principal ceremony of the night. Before the dusk, seven, as a symbol for the seven Zoroastrian angels (Amshaaspandan), heaps of bushes (of weed) are gathered before the house-gate or on the roof of the house -some visible place for the "ghosts" to guide. After the night has fallen on, the heaps are kindled and the uproarious tumult begins.

Everybody, ranging from the old to the children and the women, is excited into a passionate, memorable night. Now it is time for everybody to leap over the bonfires. They dance and sing merry notes. The traditional song of the night is: "Sorkhi-e man az to/ Zardi-e to az man", literally "my redness from you/ your yellowness from me", but figuratively it means "Give me your fiery red color and take back my wintry sallowness".

Nowadays, firecrackers and other types of fireworks and explosives are inextricable elements of the night, adding more commotion and disorder to the atmosphere and sometimes changing the locality into a battleground, so that you can easily imagine the people as warriors serving at the front. This night is one of the most diligent occasions in the year for the riot police.

In small cities and villages, the ash of the blaze traditionally is cast off in a stream or some crossroad, due its ill omens, because people have thrown off their former pain and misfortunes into it ( of course, in the northern parts of Iran, such as Gilan province, people put this ash at the foot of the trees as fertilizer). The girl or woman, who had assumed the errand, on returning is asked for her identity and she would say, in response, that she is getting back from a wedding ceremony, fetching good health and good luck with her.

Qaashoq-Zani (Spoon-hitting)
Very much like Halloween and in full disguise, usually a veil (chador) covering the entire body, longing youths go to seven different houses and make a noise by hitting a bowl with a spoon to signal the household residing in the house. Being presented, by the household, with some treat betokens a positive omen, and vice versa.

Faal-e-Gusheneshini (solitary telling of the fortune) Young women longing for a spouse make a wish, then having hidden themselves in some invisible dark corner of a passage, listen to the passers-by's talks, according to which they decide whether their wish will or will not be fulfilled; passers-by's positive talk signifies good omens, and unpleasant words point to some ill portent.

Kuze-Shekani (earthenware jar-shattering)
The household put some coal, as the sign of ill omen, and some salt, standing for evil eye, plus a cheap coin, signifying poverty, inside an earthenware jar. They turn the earthenware jar around their heads one by one. Then, one of them throws the jar over the roof onto the alley. Thus, ill omen, evil eye and poverty are driven out of the house.

Gereh-Goshaee
Similarly, women yearning to tie the knot or persons who have run into some problem, make a knot at the corner of a handkerchief or some other garment and request the first person whom they come across to undo it. The person’s willingness will signal a hopeful portent.

Shaal-Andazi (shawl-dropping)
In some parts of the country, young boys, who are engaged, drop a shawl or wraparound down from the roof of their fiancée's house and she would present him with some confection or other present. Along with these rites, there are also others such as making soup for the sick, discarding the outworn furniture, etc. In some areas, the young get their horses out and make a performance on it before the night falls on.


http://www.irpedia.com/iran/best/1555


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Re: Chaharshanbe Suri-chahar shanbe soori-Wednesday Feast-Fireworks Wednesday

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Jan 13, 2014 8:03 am

Last Wednesday of the year (Chahar Shanbeh Soori): On the eve of last Wednesday of the year, literally the eve of Red Wednesday or the eve of celebration, bonfires are lit in public places with the help of fire and light, it is hoped for enlightenment and happiness throughout the coming year. People leap over the flames, shouting:

(Sorkhi-e to az man) Give me your beautiful red color
(Zardi-e man az to) And take back my sickly pallor!

With the help of fire and light symbols of good, we hope to see our way through this unlucky night - the end of the year- to the arrival of springs longer days. Traditionally, it is believed that the living were visited by the spirits of their ancestors on the last day of the year. Many people specially children, wrap themselves in shrouds symbolically reenacting the visits. By the light of the bonfire, they run through the streets banging on pots and pans with spoons called Gashog-Zani to beat out the last unlucky Wednesday of the year, while they knock on doors to ask for treats. Indeed, Halloween is a Celtic variation of this night.

In order to make wishes come true, it is customary to prepare special foods and distribute them on this night.

Noodle Soup a filled Persian delight, and mixture of seven dried nuts and fruits, pistachios, roasted chic peas, almond, hazelnuts, figs, apricots, and raisins.

The ancient Iranians celebrated the last 10 days of the year in their annual obligation feast of all souls, Hamaspathmaedaya (Farvardigan or popularly Forodigan). They believed Foruhars (fravagar), the guardian angles for humans and also the spirits of dead would come back for reunion. These spirits were entertained as honored guests in their old homes, and were bidden a formal ritual farewell at the dawn of the New Year. The ten-day festival also coincided with festivals celebrating the creation of fire and humans. In Sasanian period the festival was divided into two distinct pentads, known as the lesser and the greater Pentad, or Panji as it is called today. Gradually the belief developed that the 'Lesser Panji' belonged to the souls of children and those who died without sin, whereas 'Greater Panji' was truly for all souls.

Spring housecleaning was carried out and bon fires were set up on the rooftops to welcome the return of the departed souls. Small clay figurines in shape of humans and animals symbolizing all departed relatives and animals were also placed on the rooftops. Zoroastrians today still follow this tradition. Flames were burnt all night to ensure the returning spirits were protected from the forces of Ahriman. This was called Suri festival. There were gatherings in joyful assemblies, with prayers, feasts and communal consumption of ritually blessed food. Rich and poor met together and the occasion was a time of general goodwill when quarrels were made up and friendships renewed.

Iranians today still carry out the spring-cleaning and set up bon fires for only one night on the last Tuesday of the year. Young and old will leap over the fires with songs and gestures of merriment. This festival was not celebrated on this night and in this manner before Islam and might be a combination of different rituals to make them last. Wednesday in Islamic tradition represents a bad omen day with unpleasant consequences. This is contrary to Zoroastrian cosmology where all days were sacred and named after a major deity. By celebrating in this manner Iranians were able to preserve the ancient tradition. The festival is celebrated on Tuesday night to make sure all bad spirits are chased away and Wednesday will pass uneventfully. In rural areas and remote villages flames are still burnt all night on the rooftops and outside the homes, though people have no idea what this is all about.

Today the occasion is accompanied by fire works from locally made firecrackers. There is no religious significance attached to it any more and is a purely secular festival for all Iranians. On the eve before the last Wednesday, bonfires are lit through out the streets and back alleys, or with the more prosperous, inside walled gardens. People leap over the flames while shouting; 'sorkhie tu az man, zardieh man az tu'.

Your fiery red color is mine and my sickly yellow paleness is your. This is a purification rite and 'suri' itself means red and fiery.

The festivities start in the early evening. Children and fun seeking adults, wrap themselves in shrouds symbolically reenacting the visits by the departed spirits. They run through the streets banging on pots and pans with spoons (Gashog-Zani or spoon banging) to beat out the last unlucky Wednesday of the year. They will knock on doors while covered and in disguise and ask for treats. The practices are very similar to Halloween, which is a Celtic version of similar festivals celebrated throughout the area in ancient times.

It is believed that wishes will come true on this night, reminiscent of ancient traditions. Wishes are made and in order to make them come true, it is customary to prepare special foods and distribute them on this night. Noodle soup called 'Ash e Chahar Shanbeh Suri is prepared' and is consumed communally. Every one even strangers passing by will be served with nuts and dried fruits. This treat is called 'Ajeel e Chahar Shanbeh Suri' and is a mixture of seven dried nuts and fruits, pistachios, roasted chic peas, almond, hazelnuts, figs, apricots, and raisins. Local variations apply and the mixture is different according to the location and the group celebrating it.

People who have made wishes will stand at the corner of an intersection, or hide behind walls to listen to conversation by passerby's. If there is anything positive and optimistic in the conversation, the belief is that the wish will come true or there is good fortune to be expected. This is called Fal-Gush meaning 'listening for one's fortune'. The night will end with more fire works and feasts where family and friends meet and with the more modern Iranians music and dance will follow. Happy Chahar Shanbeh Suri, and may your wishes come true.

Another routine of the Chahar Shanbeh Soori festival is the Iranian version of Trick or Treating associated with the Western Halloween night. Flocks of often young trick or treaters, hidden under a traditional Chador (veil) go from door to door banging a spoon against a metal bowl asking for treats or money.

Another old and almost obsolete Chahar Shanbeh Soori ritual is Falgoosh (fortune hearing!) This ritual was carried out usually by young women wanting to know their chances of finding the "Mr. Right" in the coming year. Falgoosh is the act of standing in a dark corner spot or behind a fence and listening to the conversations of the passers by and trying to interpret their statements or the subject of their dialogue as an answer to one's question(s)! This is analogous to calling a psychic reader to find out your fortune!!!

In the past several decades falgoosh has gradually become an almost unacceptable and "politically incorrect" ritual and is seldom practiced in the major urban areas. - See more at: http://iranchamber.com/culture/articles ... y8Ylj.dpuf


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Re: Chaharshanbe Suri-chahar shanbe soori-Wednesday Feast-Fireworks Wednesday-Charshanbeh Soori

Postby Parvaneh » Thu Jan 30, 2014 1:28 pm

Charshanbeh Soori is the ancient Iranian festival dating at least back to 1,700 BCE of the early Zoroastrian era. The festival of fire is a prelude to the ancient Norooz festival, which marks the arrival of spring and revival of nature. Charshanbeh Soori is celebrated the last Tuesday night of the year. The word Charshanbeh means Wednesday and Soori is red. The bonfires are lit at the sunset and the idea is to not let the sun set. Bon fires are lit to keep the sun alive till early hours of the morning and with the help of fire and light, enlightenment and happiness is hoped for throughout the coming year. On this occasion people make bonfires on the streets and jump over them. The young shoot lots of fireworks before and during Charshanbeh Soori. In older Iranic dialects such as Pashto (Pashtoons also celebrate this annual event and call it "Sheshbieh"), "soor" means the color "red". Based on Zoroastrian tradition the number of bonfires at any one place should be three representing the three holy values including: Good thoughts, Good words, and Good deeds. A bonfire can also be made in a single spot and this would symbolize unity and solidarity of Ahura.


The tradition includes people going into the streets and alleys to make fires, and jump over them while singing the traditional song Sorkhi-ye to az man; Zardi-ye man az to. The literal translation is, Your fiery red color is mine, and my sickly yellow paleness is yours. Much of the symbolism of this act links to astrological connotations associated with sign of Pisces or Esfand; the human has to face his ultimate fears and does so by jumping over the fire, a cleansing act necessary before the advent of the Spring at the Vernal Equinox. This is a purification rite and 'soori' itself means redness which hints at the color of fire. Loosely translated, this means you want the fire to take your paleness, sickness, and problems and in turn give you redness, warmth, and energy. In addition another tradition of this day is to make a special mixed nuts and berries known as problem solving nuts. Another routine of the Charshanbeh Soori is the Iranian version of trick or treating associated with the Western Halloween night. Flocks of often young trick or treaters, hidden under a traditional chador go from door to door banging a spoon against a metal bowl asking for treats or money. Receiving of the mixed nuts is customary, as is receiving a bucket of water.


Wishes are made and in order to make them come true, it is customary to prepare special foods and distribute them on this night. Noodle soup called Ash’e Charshanbeh Soori is prepared and is consumed communally. People passing by are served with nuts and dried fruits. This treat is called Ajeel’e Chaharshanbeh Soori and is a mixture of seven dried nuts and fruits, pistachios, roasted chic peas, almond, hazelnuts, figs, apricots, and raisins. Local variations apply and the mixture is different according to the location and the group celebrating it.


People who have made wishes will stand at the corner of an intersection, or hide behind walls to listen to conversation by anybody passing by. If there is anything positive and optimistic in the conversation, the belief is that the wish will come true or there is good fortune to be expected. This is called Fal-Goosh meaning listening for one’s fortune. The night will end with more fireworks, feasts where family and friends meet and more modern Iranians music and dance will follow.

There are other traditions also associated with this night. One of such traditions is the breaking of earthen jars, symbolically holding one's bad fortune. The ritual of making a knot in the corner of a handkerchief or garment and asking the first passerby to unravel it was a symbolic way to remove one’s misfortunes. Another currently seldom practiced ritual was for the youth to tie a number of multi colored scarves together. They would then proceed to climb the roof of their neighbors and lower the extended scarf through the chimney and with a few coughs inform the landlord of their presence. The landlord would then place a treat in the scarf, tie it in securely and give it a few gentle tugs so the youth could retrieve their scarf and the treat. In addition to the actual treat, this ritual also played the role of fortune telling. If the treat was candy it would foretell happiness. If it were a pomegranate, it foretold many future children. Nuts indicated patience and resistance when dealing with problems while raisins were a sign ample rainfall in the upcoming year. A silver coin would predict wealth.


This celebration, in particular the significant role of fire, is likely to hail from Zoroastrianism. Iranians celebrated the last 10 days of the year in their annual obligation feast of all souls, Hamaspathmaedaya (Farvardigan or popularly Forodigan). They believed Farvahar, the guardian angels for humans and also the spirits of dead would come back for reunion. These spirits were entertained as honored guests in their old homes, and were bidden a formal ritual farewell at the dawn of the New Year. The ten-day festival also coincided with festivals celebrating the creation of fire and humans. Thus Iranians used to light fire on the roof by burning belongings of the deceased family members attracting and persuading their soul to come back and stay with them for a night. Spring housecleaning was carried out and bon fires were set up on the rooftops to welcome the return of the departed souls. Food and wine were put aside for the spirits. Small clay figurines in shape of humans and animals symbolizing all departed relatives and animals were also placed on the rooftops. Zoroastrians today still follow this tradition with clay figurines if possible. Flames were burnt all night to ensure the returning spirits were protected from the forces of darkness.


Unfortunately out of all the traditional rituals of this festival, little has remained. All that is done these days to celebrate Charshanbeh Soori is to lit bonfires and jump over fire while most have little knowledge, if any, of the story behind this day’s celebration.

http://historicaliran.blogspot.com/2010 ... soori.html

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Re: Chaharshanbe Suri-chahar shanbe soori-Wednesday Feast-Fireworks Wednesday-Charshanbeh Soori

Postby Parvaneh » Wed Jul 09, 2014 10:09 am

On the evening of Chaharshanbeh Souri, people make fires and jump over them.

Chaharshanbeh Souri is an ancient Iranian fire festival dating back to at least 1700 BCE of the early Zoroastrian era. The festival marks the arrival of spring and revival of nature.

Chahar Shanbeh literary means Wednesday and Souri means 'Red' and 'Celebration'. The red celebration on the last Wednesday of the solar year is welcomed always and forever among Iranians.

Chahrshanbeh Souri, is celebrated on the last Tuesday evening of the year in the Iranian calendar. People lit fires at the sunset and the idea is not to let the sun set. They are supposed to keep the sun alive till the early hours of the morning.

On Tuesday evening, people go out, make fires and jump over it singing the traditional song of:

Sorkhi-ye to az man

Zardi-ye man az to

It is literally translated as:

Your burning red color shall be mine,

My sickly yellow paleness shall be yours.

Simply interpreted, it means you want the fire to take your paleness, sickness and problems; In return, the fire will give you its redness, warmth and energy.

Special Chaharshanbeh Souri Nuts, made up of raw nuts, brings sweet taste to the warm celebration observed in every Iranian home.

http://english.irib.ir/programs/iran/it ... nbeh-souri
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Chaharshanbe Suri

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Feb 01, 2015 12:42 pm

Another Iranian party, hold on a night before last Wednesday of year, is calling Chaharshanbe suri. Suri means feast, a Persian party or ceremony of fire. This traditional festival that rooted back to Zoroastrianism is celebration of light (good) winning over the darkness (bad). People set a fire from early in night till sun rise in morning and jump over it and sing a song: “Zardi- ye man az (ane) to, sorkhi-ye to az (ane) man, by means of “my yellowness for you (fire), and your redness for me”. In other words my paleness (sickness) for you (fire), your strength (health) for me. It is a carnival with no religious origin that is celebrated by most people in Iran
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