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Bazaar (Bazar) of Isfahan-Bazaar-e Bozorg

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Bazaar (Bazar) of Isfahan-Bazaar-e Bozorg

Postby Parvaneh » Wed Feb 05, 2014 6:06 am

Introduction: Bazaar (Bazar) of Isfahan (Persian:بازار اصفهان ‎)

In Iran bazaar is not only a shopping centre, but also since long times ago bazaar had certain specifications, which can not be seen in other parts of the world. The grand Bazaar of Isfahan is a complete covered town. The old Isfahan society was concentrated around the Bazaar.

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Bazaar is a trade and business complex close to all facilities necessary for a town. Bazaar and people who work in Bazaars have always been close and faithful to religions, culture and traditions. In short almost all activities of the city were concentrated around bazaars. There are various places and establishments regarding social affairs of people connected to bazaar.

The grand Bazaar of Isfahan is a complete covered town. When entrances to the bazaar were closed, all facilities were available behind these closed gates and doors.

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The grand Bazaar consists of the main axis and various smaller branches. There are cross roads or lanes which are called Char- Su (four directions). Each lane of bazaar is just like a grand tree which has several branches.

One of the main entrances to the grand Bazaar is located at the north of square. Not only the Bazaar has various lanes (branches) but also the main axis is connected to the Seljuk town (the old town). The axis passes in the neighborhood of Jame mosque.

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In each lane or branch there are entrances to various Hojreh (shop) specializing in particular goods.

There are Caravansaries inside the Bazaar. Usually each caravansary has a rectangular shaped open courtyard. A smaller place similar to caravansary is called Timcheh. There are different Timchehs in the bazaar. There are even Theological schools in the Bazaar. Old type public bath houses and several other structures can be seen in the Bazaar.

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As mentioned each lane (branch) is specified for manufacturing and selling certain type of goods, such as carpet, shoes, spices, gold, silver, handicrafts bazaars.

The main axis and lanes are about six kilometers long. Domestic tourist and local citizens prefer bazaar than new shopping centers.

http://isfahan.ir


Location: Isfahan city, Isfahan Province

Days of trip: (Without air plane) 2 Days from Tehran to Tehran (Without heavy traffic you need About 6 hr driving from Tehran to Bazaar (Bazar) of Isfahan)
Attention: In holidays there is heavy traffic in all roads around Tehran.

Best time to visit: No limit, but spring is a best time.

Daily time visit: No

Difficulty level: Easy

Requirements: -

Legal permission need: No

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Overall risk: -

Animal risk: No

Lost risk: No

Rescue: Yes, you can call 115

GSM Mobile Antenna: Yes

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Hotel: Yes

Shop: Yes

Gasoline: Yes

Village: Located in Isfahan city

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How to get there:
1- Go to Baihaghi terminal of buses in Tehran (more info), Also you can use train.
2- Take a bus ticket to Isfahan.(Distance from Tehran to Isfahan is 446 Km)
3- Take a taxi to Bazaar (Bazar) of Isfahan.

Nearest airport: Isfahan airport

Nearest train station: Isfahan station

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Location on map:




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Re: Bazaar (Bazar) of Isfahan

Postby Parvaneh » Wed Feb 05, 2014 6:15 am

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The Great Bazaar

Postby Parvaneh » Sat Apr 12, 2014 12:14 pm

The name Bazaar is very old and has its roots in the old Persian language. This Persian word followed the trade roots and was borrowed by many European and Asian languages. In Iran, the earliest reference to the word" bazaar" dates back to the 8th millennium BC.
Since the early Islamic period the bazaar has not been only a place where trade is concentrated. In fact, it has constituted the formal point of most city activities. People gathered in the bazaar not only to purchase but also to communicate, to listen to the decrees announced by royal heralds and to participate in festivals or mourning processions.

The bazaar has always had an important social power. The merchants and artisans stated a walkout in objection to the governmental deeds and all the life in the country came to a stop. In all towns, the bazaar is a covered street, or series of streets and alleyways lined with small shops grouped by service or product. In larger cities, the bazaar is a warren of streets that contains warehouses, restaurants, baths, mosques, and madresehs and lots of shops.
A bazaar usually consists of Raste Asli, a main street that, in its simplest form, is a road lined on either side by shops. In large bazaars, Raste ye Fari, the auxiliary lanes, branch of the main road. The intersection of two major bazaar lanes is called Chahar-Su. Usually the richest shops surrounded this point. Meydan, the square, most often precedes the entrance to any bazaar. The Esfahan bazaar is confined between the Old Square at its northern end and Naqshe-e-Jahan square at its southern end.

Hojreh is a small shop specializing in particular goods. Carvanserai is usually the most decorated area inside any bazaar. It consists of an open courtyard surrounded on its four sides by rooms for travelers and warehouses for goods. Timcheh was originally a small Carvanserai.
Esfahan boasts one of the richest bazaars in Iran. The entrance to the bazaar, fronting on the central square was built in 1619 and is called Qeysaiyeh.


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Bazaar-e Bozorg

Postby Parvaneh » Sat May 03, 2014 7:23 am

Bazaar-e Bozorg

Isfahan’s Bazaar-e Bozorg or Grand Bazaar, the heritage of the Seljuk and Safavid eras, is one of the oldest and largest bazaars of the Middle East.

It stretches between Imam Square and the Jameh Mosque several kilometers away. The bazaar can be entered at dozens of points along its winding route, but the main entrance is via the Qeysarieh Portal at the northern end of Imam Square.

Its high gateway is decorated with tiles and, higher up, frescoes by Reza Abbasi depict Shah Abass’ war with the Uzbeks.

Like most Iranian bazaars, Bazaar-e Bozorg is loosely divided into several interconnected corridors, each specializing in a particular trade or product, with carpet dealers, goldsmiths, samovar makers, shoemakers, dyers, all having their own quarters.

The bazaar is also linked to several mosques, tea shops, bathhouses and even gardens.

Small apertures in the vaulted roof let in sufficient light yet keep out the intense heat of summer and retain warmth in winter



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Isfahan Market-Bazaar of Isfahan

Postby Parvaneh » Sat Mar 28, 2015 10:37 am

Isfahan Market is one of the largest and most attractive markets of the cities of Iran and even the World of Islam. This market has a gateway at Imam Square, which linked new Isfahan (Of the Safavid Era) to old Isfahan (Of the Saljuqid Era). The large Isfahan Market is linked to Jameh Mosque. Alike the markets of majority of central Iranian cities, the Isfahan Market includes roofed pavements, which are located on the two sides of shops and have beautiful, vaulted roofs. To light up the market and to ventilate its interior, pores have been made over the vaulted roofs, which allow sun rays into the market. This market is comprised of different sections, each of which is the venue for sales of particular items. This is a two-storey market with a width of 4 to 8 meters. In the past, different types of silken fabric were sold in this market but currently this market is a venue for sales of different kinds of handicrafts. This large market consists of numerous small markets, including those of goldsmiths, coppersmiths, and shoe makers. Alike other Iranian markets, Isfahan Market, in a bid to meet the ever-increasing needs of people, is surrounded by smaller markets; each of which are for a particular purpose. Next to these markets, there are mosques, religious schools, and mausoleums, public water drinking places, public bathrooms, numerous motels and coffee shops. Hence the market has managed to meet the needs of people, in the domains of economic, social, political, and religious activities. Today, the market has gone through numerous changes. A lion’s share of commercial exchanges has been transferred to shops across the city and out of this market. Throughout Isfahan’s main streets, multi-storey shopping centers and large commercial complexes provide for peoples’ needs. Nonetheless, Isfahan Market has maintained its attractions and every day hundreds of tourists walk through this market’s intricate corridors, visiting this historical market and buying souvenirs. Meanwhile, as a reminder, Isfahan’s Market is not limited to what we have described already. Numerous markets are located in different districts of Isfahan; each of which are highly attractive. The Art Market of Isfahan (Gold and Jewelry Shopping Center) which is located at the northern corner of “Chahar Baagh” School is another historical attraction site of Isfahan which we will describe later on.

We spoke of Isfahan’s Qaysarieh Market and presentation of handicrafts in it. In continuation of today’s program, we will make you familiar with a number of Isfahan’s handicrafts. Historical monuments are not the only reason behind Isfahan’s global fame. This city is also well known as the largest production center of Iran’s different types of handicrafts. This city’s handicrafts have been introduced as the representative of Iranians’ original art across the globe, throughout numerous centuries. For a long while, Isfahan has been the cradle of beautiful arts and delicate industries. The brickworks, tile work, plasterworks, and calligraphy within Isfahan’s historical monuments as of 1,000 years ago to this day, prove this fact. The name of this city is a reminder of tile work, miniature paintings, and pretty patterns of printed cloth, as well as chiseled works. In fact, the majority of foreign and domestic tourists who gain the opportunity to visit Isfahan have purchased one or several handicrafts in this city. The most important handicrafts of the city of Isfahan include chiseled works over copper and brass, brocaded silk and velvet woven items, woven rugs, different arts on wood, paintings on leather, pottery, and production of printed cloth. In this section of today’s program we will brief you on chiseled works over copper and brass.

Chiseled works and different artifacts, including those made from copper and brass date back to ancient times in Iran. Not many metallic artifacts have remained from the Achamenian era. But, a collection of the silver and gold plates, remaining from the Sassanid era, which have been chiseled by Iranian experts are currently kept in a museum in Saint Petersburg. In the post-Islamic era, the chiseling industry has been highly promoted in Iran and different brass-made and metallic chiseled collections in the shape of animals and birds have remained from this era. The Safavid era marks a milestone in the development of handicrafts in the city of Isfahan, and the gunmetal works of this era are the best in the world. The patterns formed over steel are unique, highly beautiful and delicate. The gates of Imam Mosque and Chahar Baag School in the city of Isfahan are examples of the works of this era.

Today, the productions of the chiseling industry include different types of trays, flower pots, candle sticks, chandeliers, and decorated plates that have been warmly welcomed by tourists and are considered as the handicraft export items of the historical city of Isfahan.

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Re: Bazaar (Bazar) of Isfahan-Bazaar-e Bozorg

Postby Parvaneh » Sat Mar 28, 2015 10:38 am

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Re: Bazaar (Bazar) of Isfahan-Bazaar-e Bozorg

Postby Parvaneh » Sat Mar 28, 2015 10:38 am

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Re: Bazaar (Bazar) of Isfahan-Bazaar-e Bozorg

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Apr 05, 2015 5:37 am

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Re: Bazaar (Bazar) of Isfahan-Bazaar-e Bozorg

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Apr 05, 2015 5:37 am

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Re: Bazaar (Bazar) of Isfahan-Bazaar-e Bozorg

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Apr 05, 2015 5:40 am

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