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Chehel Sotoun Palace-Chihil Sutun- Chehel Sotoon-Forty Columns

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Chehel Sotoun Palace-Chihil Sutun- Chehel Sotoon-Forty Columns

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Nov 24, 2013 12:39 pm

Introduction:Chehel Sotoun Palace-Chihil Sutun- Chehel Sotoon-Forty Columns(Persian: چهل ستون)

Located about 340 km south of Tehran (The capital), Esfahan or Isfahan is the capital of Esfahan Province and Iran’s third largest city after Tehran and Mashhad.

Esfahan was once one of the largest cities in the world. It flourished from 1050 to 1722, particularly in the 16th century under the Safavid dynasty, when it became the capital of Persia for the second time in its history. Even today, the city retains much of its past glory.

Esfahan is a multi-ethnical city and Muslims, Jews and Christians live peacefully together. It is also famous for its Islamic architecture, with many beautiful boulevards, covered bridges, palaces, mosques, and minarets. This led to the Persian proverb Esfahān nesf-e jahān ast: “Esfahan is half of the world”.

The architecture of Esfahan is made up of eight traditional forms which taken together form the foundation in the same way that music was once based on a finite number of notes. These are modulated by the use of colors and textures to leaven the surfaces and are held together in an overall construction akin to that of a sonata in which connection leads to culmination through a transition space. To appreciate the skill of the architects and designers fully, it is necessary to have an appreciation of these fundamental concepts i.e. garden, platform, porch, gateway, dome, arched chamber, and minaret, although in the geometry and architecture of the buildings they are woven together to present a seamless whole.

Chehel Sotoun (also Chehel Sotoon) is a pavilion in the middle of a park at the far end of a long pool, in Isfahan built by Shah Abbas II to be used for the Shah's entertainment and receptions. In this palace, Shah Abbas II and his successors would receive dignitaries and ambassadors, either on the terrace or in one of the stately reception halls.

The name, "Forty Columns," was inspired by the twenty slender wooden columns supporting the entrance pavilion, which, when reflected in the waters of the fountain, are said to appear to be forty.

As with Ali Qapu, the palace contains many frescoes and paintings on ceramic. Many of the ceramic panels have been dispersed and are now in the possession of major museums in the west. They depict specific historical scenes such as a reception for an Uzbek King in 1646, when the palace had just been completed; a banquet in honor of the Emir of Bukhara in 1611; the battle of Chalderan against the Ottoman Sultan Selim II in 1514 in which the Persians fought without firearms; the welcome extended to the Mughal Emperor, Humayun who took refuge in Iran in 1544; the battle of Taher-Abad in 1510 where the Safavid Shah Ismail I vanquished and killed the Uzbek King. A more recent painting depicts Nadir Shah's victory against the Indian Army at Karnal in 1739. There are also less historical, but even more aesthetic compositions in the traditional miniature style which celebrate the joy of life and love.

The magnificent talar or verandah is the dominant feature of the palace and the slender columns, over 40m tall, which support it are cut from single chenar trees (platanus orientalis). The roof is also made from chenar tree beams and inset with complex decoration. The surface of much of the throne room is still covered with mirrored glass and this probably also was used on the pillars, as it was in the palace of Ali Qapu, so as to give the appearance of a roof floating in the air.

Looking out over the pool from the Verandah, one is able to appreciate the importance attached historically by Persians to the concept of "talar" which fulfilled their love of sitting in the garden while they were protected from the light and heat.

On the outside of the building there are some particularly interesting pictures of European figures, presumably based on the ambassadors and their retinue who would have stayed in the palace from time to time.

http://www.iranreview.org/content/Docum ... Palace.htm


Location: Isfahan

Days of trip: (Without air plane) 2 Days from Tehran to Tehran (Without heavy traffic you need About 6 hr driving from Tehran to Isfahan)
Attention: In holidays there is heavy traffic in all roads around Tehran.

Best time to visit: No limit

Daily time visit: No

Difficulty level: Easy

Requirements: -

Legal permission need: No


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Overall risk: -

Animal risk: No

Lost risk: No

Rescue: Yes, you can call 115

GSM Mobile Antenna: Yes


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Hotel: Yes

Shop: Yes

Gasoline: Yes

Village: Located in Isfahan city


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How to get there:
1- Go to Baihaghi terminal of buses in Tehran (more info), Also you can use train.
2- Take a bus ticket to Isfahan.
3- Take a taxi to Chehel Sotoun Palace

Nearest airport: Isfahan airport

Nearest train station: Isfahan station


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Location on map:





Pictures:

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Re: Chehel Sotoun Palace

Postby Parvaneh » Sat Jan 04, 2014 10:01 am

Variant Names Chehel Sutun, Chehel Sotun, Chihil Sutun Pavilion, Chihil Sutun Palace, Palace Complex at Isfahan
Location Isfahan, Iran

Client Shah Abbas II
Date 1647/1057 AH; rebuilt 1706/1117-18 AH
Style/Period Safavid

Century 17
Building Type palatial

Building Usage garden pavilion

Located on axis to the west of the Maydan within what was once the palace gardens, the Chihil Sutun is one of the two remaining pavilions built as part of the palace complex. The second is the Hasht Behesht.
After a fire the pavilion was largely rebuilt in 1706, at which time the talar with 20 wooden columns was added.
The reception hall is reached through a mirrored niche in the iwan at the rear of the talar. This hall is a domed rectangular room lined with four large historical murals. Smaller rooms accessed at the corners have wall paintings of either pleasure or literary scenes, executed in a style earlier to that of the reception hall paintings.
The sides of the building have semi-enclosed porches, also with paintings. Of interest is the use of varying degrees of interiority, with enclosure decreasing toward the garden.
Along with the Ali Qapu and Hasht Behesht, the Chihil Sutun was restored by IsMEO - Istituto Italiano per il Medio ed Estremo Oriente for NOCHMI - National Organization for Conservation of Historic Monuments of Iran. The project, completed in 1977, received an Aga Khan Award for Architecture in 1980.
Sources:
Blair, Sheila S. and Jonathan M. Bloom. 1994. The Art and Architecture of Islam. New Haven: Yale University Press, 192-193.
Hillenbrand, Robert. 1994. Islamic Architecture: Form, Function and Meaning. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 428-433.
Michell, George. 1978. Architecture of the Islamic World. London: Thames and Hudson, 73, 254.


http://archnet.org/library/sites/one-si ... te_id=3939

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Re: Chehel Sotoun Palace-Chihil Sutun- Chehel Sotoon-Forty Columns

Postby Parvaneh » Wed Jan 29, 2014 11:19 am

Built in 1647, Chehel Sotoun is a pavilion in the middle of a garden covering 67,000 Sq. meters at the far end of a long rectangle shaped pool, in Isfahan, Iran, built by Shah Abbas II to be used for the Shah's entertainment and receptions. In this palace, Shah Abbas II and his successors would receive dignitaries and ambassadors, either on the terrace or in one of the stately reception halls. Shah Abbas II built Chehel Sotoun inside a vast royal park round an earlier building erected by Shah Abbas I. The Chehel Sotoun palace is one of the sixteen Safavid palaces in Isfahan, four of which are left.


The name, "Forty Columns," was inspired by the twenty slender wooden columns supporting the entrance pavilion, which, when reflected in the waters of the fountain, are said to appear to be forty. Each column is made of a plain tree with a thin layer of colored board fitted on the skin. The layer was formerly covered with colored pieces of glass and mirror. The wooden pillars support an elegant terrace with a light wooden ceiling of wide fretwork louvers. The terrace is only a few steps high and opens the pavilion onto the gardens and an elegant pool. The ceiling still keeps its beams, covering, painted wood louvers, and carefully lay-work-rosettes and suns, stars, stylized fruit and foliage.


According to some studies, the possibility of the existence of another pool on the western side of the palace (which was filled due to the changes that took place during the Qajar era) was explored. In 2006 such a pool was in fact discovered and unearthed. Archeological studies show that the discovered pool which was found on the west side of the palace is much bigger than the one found previously on the east side. Studies also revealed that during the Safavid period, water was transferred from this pool to the eastern one and then through canals it was directed to Naqsh’e Jahan Square.


As with Ali Qapu, the palace contains many frescoes and paintings on ceramic. The upper part of the inside walls are decorated with six wall paintings, which represent Safavid court life and military exploits. The area beneath these frescos is covered with smaller paintings, closely similar to Persian miniatures. The paintings portray the parties held by Shah Abbas II, reception of Mohammad Vali Khan, the king of Turkistan, the war between Shah Ismail the first and the Ottoman forces in Chaldoran, and the reception party in honor of Homayoun, the king of India. A more recent painting portrays Nader Shah's victory against the Indian Army at Karnal in 1747. There are also traditional miniatures celebrating the joy of life and love.
The whole room is covered by a series of Safavid objects including carpets, armor, porcelain and coins. The Chehel Sotoun has been badly damaged during different eras, especially while the Afghan invasion when the paintings were covered with a thick coat of whitewash. All the walls used to be decorated with large mirrors and colored pieces of glass and beautiful paintings. Many parts of the building including the vaulted ceiling and the throne room have been largely restored to their original design.


The palace is now a museum of Safavid paintings and ceramics, which attracts millions of domestic and foreign visitors. In 2005 safe guarding plans were to be implemented to include the installation of early fire prevention systems.

http://historicaliran.blogspot.com.ar/2 ... ilion.html

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Re: Chehel Sotoun Palace-Chihil Sutun- Chehel Sotoon-Forty Columns

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Apr 07, 2014 7:45 am

The Chehel Sotune Palace and its garden cover an area of approximately 67,000 sq. m. This palace was constructed during the reign of Shah Abbas I. Shah Abbas II was also responsible for additions to this palace, such as the hall of mirrors, the hall of 18 pillars and two large chambers facing the north and south. The spectacular hall of mirrors with its decorative mirror work, tile work and paintings, along with its majestic porches and pool which faces this hall, all add to its splendor.
Interesting aspects of the Chehel Sotune Palace are:
The stone lions at the four corners of the central pool, the hall and marble and vaulted cornices around it.
The gilded adornments, paintings and the portrait of the sovereign in the royal hall. Along with that of the chambers surrounding the hall of mirrors.
The portrait of Shah Abbas I with the special crown and the miniatures of the treasury room.
Several facades such as the 'Qotbiyeh Mosque', 'Zaviyeh in Kushk', and the imprints of the 'Dar-e-Joubareh' and 'Aqasi Mosque' are affixed in the western and southern walls of the garden. The hall and porches of this palace were constructed during the fifth year of the reign of Shah Abbas II. The reflection of the twenty pillars of the hall in the pool opposite the palace brings about a conception of forty pillars. Hence the name Chehel Sotune.

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Chehel Sotoon Palace- 40 Sotoon Place

Postby Parvaneh » Sat Apr 12, 2014 11:46 am

Chehel Sotoon Palace

This palace was built primarily during the reign of Shah Abbas I, with a "U-shaped" plan, comprised of the thron, hall and flanking rooms in the north and the southern part of the eastern side, it was expanded to the present form towards west during the reign of Shah Abbas II in 1057 A.D. This palace was opened by the presence of officers and the great men from Iran and other countries as a palace of ceremonies. Among the annexations of this building in Shah Abbas II era, we can point to places such as; southern and northern angles saloons, veranda, Talar Aeineh (saloon) with 20 pillars and a long swimming pool on eastern angle and in front of columned veranda. The most important features of Chehel sotoon palace are the beautiful paintings of an artist in Safavid era called "Reza Abbasi" who has decorated the walls of saloons in Iranian miniature style. Each of this painting expresses the historical events in Safavid and Afsharieh era. For instance we can point to reception meeting of Homayoon the king of India by Shah Tahmaseb as host, and the Chaldoran battle between Shah Smail and Sultan Salim Khan the Turkish emperor, the Reception meeting of Turkistan ruler named "Vali Mohammad Khan" by Shah Abbas as a host, the Reception meeting of Turkistan ruler named "Nader Mohammad Khan by Shah Abbas II as host, the Kornal battle between Nader Shah Afshar and Mohammad Shah Gurkani the king of India and the battle between Shah Smail I and Sheibak Khan Ozbak.

It is considerable that two pictures about Chaldoran and Kornal battles are the annexation of this building after Safavid periods. According to existing documents, these pictures have been drawn by "Agha Sadegh" the painter. There are also some paintings in one part of the palace which are belonged to "Anzhel and Loogar from Netherlands who had come to Iran and Isfahan in the period of Shah Abbas II.
There are also some paintings about imaginative characters which have been drown for decorating the building in lower part of the walls in main saloon.
The etymology of this building to Chehel sotoon (fourty columns) is that in Iranian culture, the number 40 indicates the sense of infinity and richness and some believe that the number 20 plus reflections of 20 columns on the surface of the pool, summing up the numerical denomination of 40 columns of palace.
The Chehel sotoon palace involved serious damages in the period of Zeleh Sultan the son of Naseredin Shah Ghajar in Isfahan, so that most decorations especially in columned saloon were damaged.
This palace was changed into museum in 1327 solo by the support of officials and the efforts of whom loved culture. At present some parts of survived monuments which are belonged to different historical periods particularly Safavid era have exposed to common people.

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Re: Chehel Sotoun Palace-Chihil Sutun- Chehel Sotoon-Forty Columns

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Apr 27, 2014 10:13 am

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Re: Chehel Sotoun Palace-Chihil Sutun- Chehel Sotoon-Forty Columns

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Apr 27, 2014 10:14 am

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Re: Chehel Sotoun Palace-Chihil Sutun- Chehel Sotoon-Forty Columns

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Apr 27, 2014 10:16 am

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Re: Chehel Sotoun Palace-Chihil Sutun- Chehel Sotoon-Forty Columns

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Apr 27, 2014 10:19 am

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Re: Chehel Sotoun Palace-Chihil Sutun- Chehel Sotoon-Forty Columns

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Apr 27, 2014 10:21 am

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