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The Glassware and Ceramic Museum of Iran

Helpful information about palaces and museums in Iran like name, introduction, maps, requirements and...

The Glassware and Ceramic Museum of Iran

Postby Fatemeh_abdi » Wed Oct 30, 2013 10:29 am

Introduction: The premises that have been turned into museum where glass and clay works are on display were built about 90 years ago upon orders of Ahmad Qavam (Qavam-ol-Saltaneh) for his personal lodging (residence and working office). The building is situated in a garden with a span of 7000 square meters and was used by Qavam himself till the year 1953.
Later, the building were sold to the Egyptians as the new premises for the embassy of Egypt and remained in their possession for seven years. When relations were strained between Iran and Egypt at the time of Abdul Nasser and subsequent to the closure of the Egyptian embassy in Iran, the Commercial Bank purchased the building.
However, it was sold to Farah Pahlavi’s bureau in 1976 and was turned into a museum by three groups of Iranian, Austrian and French architects. The museum was opened in 1980 and was registered in the list of national heritage in 1998.
The main establishment of the museum that occupies an area of 1040 square meters is a two-storey octagonal building with suspended pillars and a basement. It is situated on the entrance side of the premises. The architectural style of the building is a combination of the traditional Iranian style and the European architecture of the 19th century.
The first floor is connected to the second one through wooden steps in Russian style. Prior to the time when the building was transferred into the Egyptian embassy, the entrance of the museum was doomed-shaped but was later flattened.
Parts of the walls in the basement are decorated in traditional style with big tiles. Double windows have been used in the architecture of the building instead of terrace and wooden doors have been installed behind the windowpanes in order to regulate the light and temperature of the interior of the building. The exterior and interior of the museum comprise such decorations as brick works, plaster works, mirror works and inlaid works

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Location:No. 75, 30 Tir St., jomhoori Ave.Tehran, Iran.

Phone:(+98) 21 - 66708153-4
Phone:(+98) 21 - 66716930
Days of trip: 1 day

Best time to visit: Every time of year

Daily time visit: Open Every day except for Mondays and Religious Holidays,09 a.m. to 05 p.m.

Legal permission need: No legal permission is needed

Admition:
• 25000 Rials for foreign tourists.
• 2500 Rials for Iranian adults.
• Free admission for members of Association of the Friends of Cultural Heritage with ID cards.
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How to get there:
It is easily reached by public transportation or by automobile.

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Location on map:



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More information:
http://www.glasswaremuseum.ir/
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Abguineh, Iran’s glassware and ceramic museum

Postby Parvaneh » Sat Dec 21, 2013 3:01 pm

The old brick construction of Abguineh Museum has a relatively long history, it used to be the residence and office of Ahmad Qavam (1876 - 1955), a politician who served as Prime Minister of Iran. Afterwards, the Egyptian Embassy in Tehran took over the building and finally handed it over to the Iranian Commercial Bank. From 1976, a group of Iranian and Austrian architects refurbished the building and converted it into a museum which was opened on 1989. The decorations of the building include brickworks of the exterior facade and interior plaster cutouts, mirror works and inlaying.

As one of the Iranian famous museums, Abguineh museum comprises several halls and workshops and a library. Art works and handicrafts exhibited in this museum include three collections of porcelains, glassworks and crystals.

Porcelains
The magnificent collection of porcelains exhibits a thorough history of ceramics and porcelains made in Iran from the dawn of history until today. It also provides a bulk of information about the evolution of porcelain and its production technique. Major centers of porcelain making in Iran including Kashan, Ray, Qazvin, Gorgan and Neishabour are also introduced.
Visiting this museum, one learns about simple and colorful glazed porcelains and the art of decorating them with calligraphic designs, paintings of plants and animals and geometrical designs over and under the layer of the glaze.
Some of these porcelains enjoy paintings on the basis of proverbs and old mythical and folk tales.

Glass works
Glass works that are exhibited in this museum start from the ones made in the first and second millennia BC and extend up to modern ones. In this section the glass works production technique including the sand molds, cutting and pressing equipment are introduced. The painting method on the glass is also exhibited.

Crystals
On the ground floor hall of the museum, crystal and flint glass samples of 18th and 19th centuries are exhibited. All these samples are mostly cut and made in Europe.

Specialized library
On the northwestern courtyard of the museum, there is a specialized library whish contains almost 4,000 books on archeology and the history of art. A hall is also allocated to exhibit the glassworks and porcelains made by contemporary artists and craftsmen. Workshops to teach production of glassworks, crystal cuttings, porcelains and their painting are also provided.



Source:Tehrantimes
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Re: The Glassware and Ceramic Museum of Iran

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Jan 05, 2014 6:02 am

Location Tehrān, Iran
Architect/Planner Hans Hollein
Client Special Office of the Shahbanou
Date 1978
Centuries 19th, 20th
Decade 1970s
Building Types public/cultural, residential
Building Usage museum, private residence

This 19th century Qajar mansion is two-storey high and displays a mixture of classical Rococo, Art Nouveau, and Persian features. The building assumes a rectangular overall shape and and entrance porch surmounted by a balcony in its center. On both floors, the rooms are arranged on either side of a circular stairwell. Due to the additional floor loads, the galleries overlooking the centrall hall were reinforced by means of columns. The richly decorated interior walls were kept untouched in most cases and show-cases, designed by the architect with built-in lighting systems were placed in the center of some rooms. In a few instances, structural changes were inevitable and existing spaces were therefore transformed. Most fireplaces were kept in place although they are no longer used for heating purposes.

(Source: AKTC)

http://archnet.org/library/sites/one-si ... te_id=4108

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Glassware and Ceramic Museum

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Jan 05, 2014 6:02 am

Glassware and Ceramic Museum



The beautiful building of the Museum of Glassware and Ceramic was originally ordered to be built as the personal residence of a politician named Ahmad Qavam in the early 1920s.

The building was his residence and office till 1953 when it was sold to the Egyptian Embassy, IranChamber reported.

When relations were strained between Iran and Egypt at the time of Abdul Nasser and subsequent to the closure of the Egyptian Embassy in Iran, the Commercial Bank purchased the building.

However, it was sold in 1976 and turned into a museum by three groups of Iranian, Austrian and French architects. The museum was opened in 1980 and registered on the National Heritage List in 1998.

The architectural style of the building is a combination of the traditional Iranian and European architectures of the 19th century.



Different Sections

The first floor is connected to the second by wooden steps in Russian style. Prior to the building’s transformation into the Egyptian Embassy, the entrance of the museum was dome-shaped but was later flattened.

The building is located in a garden measuring 7,000 square meters in Tehran.

Objects exhibited in this museum belong to a span of time beginning from pre-Islam period up to contemporary Iran.

There is plenty of exquisite plasterwork performed by Iranian masters on the interior walls of the building.

On the first floor, at the entrance of the museum, the hall showcases the location of archeological sites under excavation.

On the walls are maps showing ancient regions on the Iranian plateau as well as a useful timetable of ancient civilizations. The museum objects, in general, can be divided into five categories, which are displayed in different halls.



Enamel and Crystal Gallery

Potteries in the Enamel Section consist of samples of plain clay vessels having angular and animal patterns.

On some artifacts, the early examples of glass glazes dating back to the 3rd millennium BC can be found.

The collection of Chogha-Zanbil temple glass tubes as well as opaque perfume holders, ornaments and seals exhibited belong to the first and second millennium BC.

In the Crystal Section, Achaemenian and Parthian cut crystal vessels and bottles are displayed for visitors. Various vessels of Sassanian and post-Islam period are also added to this collection bearing molded, applied, pressed and cut decorations.



Nacre and Gold Gallery

The evolution of Sassanian arts and techniques are observed in the Nacre gallery. Some samples of 9th to 13th centuries AD are also exhibited in this gallery. In fact, the flourishing period of glassware and pottery is presented here.

Artifacts presented in the Gold Gallery consist of enameled and luster vessels of the 10th to 13th centuries.

The inscriptions are generally expressions, good prayers and poems attributed to Nezami and Ferdowsi. Patterns are mainly human figures in various ceremonies and animals, especially birds.



Lapis-Lazuli Gallery

Following the damage suffered by the glass and pottery-making centers in Iran, Safavid king, Shah Abbas I, initiated the revival of lapis-lazuli and enhanced it with the help of Chinese and Italian artists.

The objects of these two galleries show marked changes in the forms and decorations of glassware and pottery artifacts using lapis-lazuli stones. Vases, sprinklers and ewers in lapis lazuli and light orange colors belong to Shiraz and Isfahan.

There are also crystal vessels belonging to the 18th and 19th centuries from Europe exhibited in a separate showcase.

A library, located in the northwest section of the gardens surrounding the museum, has approximately 3,000 books in Farsi and English on archeology, history and arts for students and researchers.

(Source: Iran Daily)


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Re: The Glassware and Ceramic Museum of Iran

Postby Parvaneh » Sun Apr 27, 2014 12:20 pm

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