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Blue Mosque of Tabriz -Masjede Kabod- Kaboud

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Blue Mosque of Tabriz -Masjede Kabod- Kaboud

Postby Mehdi » Sun Aug 18, 2013 12:16 pm

Introduction: Religious monument worthy of the Blue Mosque is order that the capital city of Tabriz was put to work Ezzaldin been built and inscriptions referring to the door leading to the year 870 AH. That building, completed is reached.

Jahanshah reign in 839 AH. Begin until 872 AH. Continued to Has an, who was killed in the tribe stall authority of his government and the Heart of Asia Minor to the Persian Gulf and was extensively dismantled . The main building of the mosque and tomb, a large courtyard which was a collection of buildings, including schools and libraries, and Bath and hospice. . . Unfortunately that was made of their works is not here.

A prominent feature of the famous Blue Mosque with a great combination of special architectural wonder it's more due to a combination of brick and Tile and mosaic tiles, the carpet is too busy and it is the miracle of the grace of the interior and exterior surfaces. Highlight the text scrolls over the elegant doors and filled the role of the journalist, and also called Winchester blessings of Allah bin Mohammad, calligrapher and designer of the designs of the Azerbaijani artists featured calligraphy, is inserted.
It is thought that the Blue Mosque, the buildings have been erected as a monument of victory Jahanshah so that in this chapter can be "conquered" and form a fully featured, great is the grace around the yard be. Jahanshah name in the inscription above the door closed before the coating is golden.

Blue Mosque has two minarets, narrow and long in the extreme north side of East and West, in the back door to the large yard, a bit of Persian poetry written in the third line of the theme:

Byar's actions and it is round speech, saying that his work
Large yard and porch on three sides and on top of the dome 17 meters in diameter has been double-blind. Small private yard in the area and was considered the royal tombs, located in the south and parts of the marble plinth, was ranked third, and to highlight the beautiful lines of the Qur'anic verses to grace the upper rocks.
Tile it simply "the color blue and the" hexagonal pieces of work and all of its roof Zarnegar (gold painting with water) and probably marble floor of the bedchamber. The mosque contains the node number of geometric mosaic and painting, journalist, and plant flowers and arabesques and scrolls totally different story that is of extraordinary beauty.

Jahanshah tomb and a small yard at the end of his relatives were in the cellar. Massive earthquake in the year 1193 AH. Tabriz causing havoc and killing many people and have several pillar and base of the Blue Mosque, but the door does not fit in the space between the year after the quake to begin repairs, door and parts and marble
The Blue Mosque in 1310. The national index was registered in 1343 and most of the repairs done and has been renovated in the years 54_1352.
Domes over the yard and by the late Ismail Dibaj and technical office and the ability to protect ancient monuments and the famous architect of the late Azerbaijani, Professor Reza Architects wore fulfilled. Landscaping work and was now open and journalist inscriptions inside the mosque is on going.

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Location: Tabriz

Days of trip: (Without air plane) 2-3 Days from Tehran to Tehran (Without heavy traffic you need About 8 hr driving from Tehran to Tabriz)
Attention: In holidays there is heavy traffic in all roads around Tehran.

Best time to visit: No limit, but spring is b best time.

Daily time visit: No permission at night

Difficulty level: Easy

Requirements: (Depend on your plan) Guide or GPS track, water, food, warm and waterproof clothes and tent

Legal permission need: No


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Overall risk: -

Animal risk: No

Lost risk: No

Rescue: Yes, you can call 115

GSM Mobile Antenna: Yes


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Hotel: Yes

Shop: Yes

Gasoline: Yes

Village: Located in Tabriz city


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How to get there:
1- Go to Baihaghior west terminal of buses in Tehran (more info), Also you can use train.
2- Take a bus ticket to Tabriz.
3- Take a taxi to the mosque


Nearest airport: Tabriz airport

Nearest train station: Tabriz station


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Location on map:




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Re: Blue Mosque (Masjede Kabod) - Tabriz

Postby Parvaneh » Mon Feb 24, 2014 6:02 am

The historical city of Tabriz in Iran's East Azarbaijan Province houses some of the most spectacular examples of Islamic and Iranian architecture.

One of these grand structures is the Blue Mosque, also known as the Turquoise of Islam for the stunningly beautiful azure and turquoise mosaics covering both its interior and exterior.

The Blue Mosque (Masjed-e Kaboud), also known as Masjed-e Mozaffariya, was built during the rule of the Qara Qoyunlu Dynasty (1351-1469) and completed in 1465.

The mosque was severely damaged in an earthquake in 1779, leaving only the entrance iwan. Reconstruction began in 1973 by the late Reza Memaran Benam under the supervision of Iranian Ministry of Culture.

The 15th-century structure was built upon an order by the Qara Qoyunlu leader Jahan Shah, who is buried on the southern part of the mosque after being killed by the ruler of the rival tribe of Aq Qoyunlu, Uzun Hassan.

The Qara Qoyunlu Turkmens were a Shia Turkish tribe that ruled over present-day Armenia, Azerbaijan, north western Iran, eastern Turkey and Iraq from 1375 to 1468.

Jahan Shah was the most famous Qara Qoyunlu leader, who ruled the South Caucasus and Iranian Azerbaijan, from 1438 to 1467. He also expanded the Qara Qoyunlu territory to include Western Anatolia, most of present day Iraq and central Iran.

The only major structure still standing in the dynasty’s capital illustrates the artistic brilliance of Tabriz. The extant tilework documents artistic connections with contemporary architecture in Timurid Khorasan and in the Ottoman Empire.

The Blue Mosque belongs to the architectural complex known as Mozaffariya.

Khatoun Jan Begom (died 1469), a wife of the Qara Qoyunlu ruler Jahanshah (ruled during 1439-67), established the mosque’s endowment. The inscription of the portal gives 24 November 1465 as the date when the construction was completed.

Jahan Shah built the Blue Mosque after making Tabriz his capital.

The original complex was built under the supervision of Ezzoddin Qapouchi in 1465 and included a school, a public bath and a library.

The mausoleum was built in the southern section of the mosque and is entirely covered with high marble slabs on which verses from Quran are engraved in Thulth script on a background of fine arabesques.

The roof of the mausoleum and the main dome chamber of the mosque collapsed during an earthquake in 1779 A.D. and was rebuilt in 1973 thanks to the efforts of Reza Memaran Benam (a famous architect from Tabriz) under the supervision of the national organization for preservation of ancient monuments.

The diverse Kufic, and Thulth scripts, the exquisite arabesque patterns, and the admirable choramatic compositions of these facades, which are truly stupendous, were created by Nematollah-ben-Mohammad-ol-Bavab, the famous calligraphist. The walls (inside & outside) had been covered with mosaic tiles.

The building complex served multiple functions, but only the mosque and the mausoleum are still standing. The vanished buildings and structures include a sufi convent, an underground canal and a garden called Begomabad or Bagh-e Begom, as well as perhaps a school and bathhouses.

Next to the Mozaffariya was a bazaar with 55 shops, where the founder’s daughters also owned property. The building complex was first consecrated to Khatoun Jan Begom, who was buried with her children in the mausoleum. Jahanshah is also said to have been buried there.

All tombs have vanished and there are merely traces of three graves in the mausoleum’s crypt.

The Blue Mosque was still under construction when the Aq Qoyunlu conquered Tabriz.

After the death of Jahanshah and Khatoun Jan Begom, their daughter Saleha Khatoun oversaw the construction work, and during the reign of the Aq Qoyunlu ruler Ya’qoub (ruled during 1478-90), the mausoleum’s cupola and its main parts were completed.

Details from the mausoleum’s interior, such as alabaster pieces from the wall panels and the main prayer niche, reveal that the mausoleum was never completely finished.

Nonetheless, the Blue Mosque itself served as a mosque during the first half of the 16th century, when Tabriz became the first capital of the Safavid dynasty (1501-1732) between 1501 and 1555. Since the military conflicts with the Ottoman Empire had weakened the Safavid defense, Ottoman troops looted Tabriz, as well as the Blue Mosque, in 1514, after their victory in the battle of Chalderan.

The troops of Selim I took at least eight carpets from the Blue Mosque to Istanbul, since in 1530 Selim I offered some of these to the newly built Gazi Husrev Bey Mosque in Sarajevo. While it is not known whether the building complex itself was attacked during the Ottoman occupation, violent earthquakes damaged the Blue Mosque between the 16th and 18th centuries.

Already in the 17th century, the Blue Mosque was completely destroyed and abandoned.

In the 20th century, the monument was finally restored by rebuilding its cupolas and missing walls, and by replacing its beautiful tile panels.

A stone foundation supports a structure of fired bricks, which is completely covered with tiles and decorated brick panels.

Alabaster was used for the mausoleum’s dado and three prayer niches, and probably also for the door to the mausoleum, of which a fragment has been preserved, and the windows in the gallery. Jean-Baptiste Tavernier, a French traveler, observed that the alabaster slabs created a warm red light inside the building.

The T-shape floor plan is unusual for an Iranian mosque. The main entrance leads to an antechamber that forms the center of a gallery that surrounds the central dome chamber on three sides, and whose two arms lead to the two prayer niches on the south side of the building.

The gallery supports nine cupolas, three on each side, and each arm ends in a vault above a prayer niche. The central dome (22-meter high) rests on eight arches. The description of the two pulpits by Tavernier indicates that the imam led the prayer from this central room.

In the corner pillars of these eight arches are four upper galleries. On the south side, the central dome chamber abuts the mausoleum. Its wooden door was usually closed so that the mausoleum was invisible from the prayer room, though it could be accessed through two disguised openings flanking the door. Four arched bays support the tall dome chamber and a crypt is below the prayer niche.

On the exterior walls of the Blue Mosque are many interesting under-glaze tiles, which are adorned with a black line and painted in white on a dark blue ground. Most of these are square blue-and-white tiles (5 × 5 cm) with floral or geometric ornaments.

Similar blue-and-white tiles, which may be related to those of the Blue Mosque, have been identified in some collections.

Blue-and-white tiles were not widely used in 15th-century Iran, and the Blue Mosque constitutes an outstanding example of blue-and-white tilework.

In Timurid Khorasan, blue-and-white tiles similar to those of the Blue Mosque were used in the Gowharshad Mosque in Mashhad.

The eye-catching tile work was mostly in azure and turquoise with a touch of black and white here and there.

The main entrance is adorned with mosaics bearing Quranic verses written in Tuluth and Kufic scripts.

The inscription engraved on the mosque's grand entrance includes the name of Nematollah ibn Mohammad Bavab, one of the most prominent calligraphers of Azerbaijan who designed the unique tile patterns.

Jahan shah's name is also inscribed on the entrance and was previously coated with gold.

The Al-Fath (Arabic word for victory) Surah has also been completely engraved above the mosque's main sanctuary which is surrounded by porticos on three sides and a double shell dome above.

The mosque has two tall minarets at its northern wing and a Persian couplet has been written on the back of the entrance door to its main sanctuary.

There is also a smaller sanctuary on the southern side of the mosque which used to be a private chamber for Jahan Shah.

The royal sanctuary was dado treated with marble and adorned with Quranic verses inscribed in Tuluth and on a background of delicate arabesque patterns.

On both sides along the corridor, there stand the remains of the chambers with vaulted roofs. The walls of the mosque have been riveted with marble slabs and decorated with superb mosaic tiles. Some of the blue mosaics in the mosque's portal are heavily damaged and half missing.

Remains of the original building show that the mosque was mostly covered with turquoise and hexagonal tiles which were decorated with geometrical fretwork, floral arabesque and different inscriptions.

Experts also believe that the ceiling had been gold inlaid and the sanctuary floors were made of marble.

Jahan shah and his close relatives were laid to rest at the end of the mosque's small sanctuary in the southern part of the mosque.

The mausoleum is entirely covered with high marble slabs bearing Thulth Quranic verses on a background of fine arabesques.

An earthquake in 1779 almost destroyed the entire structure except the front piece and a number of piers.

The marble and golden pieces used in the building were also plundered in the time period from the earthquake to the beginning of the restoration project in 1973.

What remains of the mosque bears witness to its earlier grandeur and splendor. Even today the Timurid tilework of its main entrance with a blue-on-white inscription band of mosaic tile in Riqa' is a magnificent and remarkable piece of architecture.

The Blue Mosque was registered as a national heritage site in 1931 and its restoration was almost finished by 1964.

Today the Blue Mosque is one of the major tourist attractions in Tabriz which draws thousands of Iranian and international visitors every year.

Watch the Video: http://www.shiatv.net/view_video.php?vi ... 0ca0cf48e3

Blue Mosque: http://www.360cities.net/image/blue-mos ... 10.62,70.0

http://www.iranreview.org/content/Docum ... _Islam.htm


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Re: Blue Mosque of Tabriz -Masjede Kabod- Kaboud

Postby Parvaneh » Sat Apr 05, 2014 12:00 pm

Experts also believe that the ceiling had been gold inlaid and the sanctuary floors were made of marble.



Jahan shah and his close relatives were laid to rest at the end of the mosque's small sanctuary in the southern part of the mosque.

The mausoleum is entirely covered with high marble slabs bearing Thulth Quranic verses on a background of fine arabesques.

An earthquake in 1779 almost destroyed the entire structure except the front piece and a number of piers.

The marble and golden pieces used in the building were also plundered in the time period from the earthquake to the beginning of the restoration project in 1973.

What remains of the mosque bears witness to its earlier grandeur and splendor. Even today the Timurid tilework of its main entrance with a blue-on-white inscription band of mosaic tile in Riqa' is a magnificent and remarkable piece of architecture.

The Blue Mosque was registered as a national heritage site in 1931 and its restoration was almost finished by 1964.

Restorations started under the supervision of renowned architect Mohammad-Reza Memaran from Tabriz and the national organization for the preservation of ancient monuments.

Today the Blue Mosque is one of the major tourist attractions in Tabriz which draws thousands of Iranian and international visitors every year.


http://english.irib.ir/radioculture/ira ... lue-mosque

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Re: Blue Mosque of Tabriz -Masjede Kabod- Kaboud

Postby Parvaneh » Sun May 25, 2014 9:53 am

Blue Mosque
The Blue Mosque (or Masjid-e Kaboud) on the north side of town, is a 15th-century structure destroyed partially by one of Tabriz's recurrent earthquakes. The entrance portal with its two minarets appears to have been connected with the main prayer hall (Shabestan) under the largest cupola of the mosque, by means of vaulted corridor. On both sides along the corridor, there stand the remains of the chambers with vaulted roofs. The walls of the mosque have been riveted with marble slabs and decorated with superb mosaic tiles. Some of the blue mosaics in the mosque's portal are heavily damaged and half missing.
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Tabriz blue mosque

Postby Parvaneh » Wed Jan 28, 2015 11:30 am

Period: Qaraquyunlo
Location: Imam St,between saat square& shahid beheshti crossroad(Mansor)
Shah Jahan Mosque or Blue Mosque in Tabriz was built according to the order of abol mozafar jahanshah ben Qara Yusuf who was from Abomozaffar Jahanshah Torkaman Qarquyunlolar dynasty, In 1449 by John Big Khaton (wife Jahanshah Bin Qara Yousef Qaraquyunlolar) efforts & supervision. This building is the masterpieces of Islamic architecture and is known as a turquoise in Islamic world which is decorated with turquoise and azure mosaic tiles with a variety of prescription, nastaliq, sols hand writing and original design of engineering and arabesque style. The mosque destroyed in 1772 earthquake and Between 1939 and 1966 restoration and repairing of mosque was conducted by Professor Reza memaran. The Brick dome of the Blue Mosque is the largest brick buildings in the ninth hijri century which is constructed by Islamic architects that is considered as continues patriarch architecture period .
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Kaboud Mosque

Postby Parvaneh » Tue Mar 31, 2015 5:01 am

Kaboud Mosque, maintains a beautiful blue dome and red tiling in its façade and interior design. The construction of this mosque dates back to the reign of “Jahan Shah Qareh Qoyonlou”, in 15th Century AD, and its founder has been Jahan Shah’s daughter, Saalehe.

The mosque’s gate is located in a high-altitude region; and at the upper part of this gateway, an oval-shaped arc is observed. On the two sides of the mosque, there are a number of pillars; with an oval shaped crescent at their upper part. These pillars are made of pretty blue tiles, and are covered with decorations and patterns. By passing through the gateway, we enter the roofed section of the mosque. The inner walls under the mosque’s roofed part are covered with colorful tiles. These tiles have been bonded together in small pieces, with full uniformity. Delicate taste has been taken into consideration in the combination of colors, which astonishes any viewer.

The famous Turkic tourist, Oliya Chalabi, who traveled to Tabriz in the first half of 11th Century AH, has praised the glory and grandeur of this building in its travel book. He points out: “Kaboud Mosque’s gate is taller that Kasraa Arch in the vicinity of Baghdad. This building has been decorated with beautiful tiles and maintains tall domes. Its gate and walls have been decorated with colorful tiles that astound all viewers.”

In additional to its magnificent tiling, this mosque maintains precious cobblestone floor. The French archeologist, Jane Dieulafoy, who visited this mosque more than 120 years ago, has described the cobblestone floor of this mosque. She notes: “The cobblestone floor of this building is highly fascinating. This part of the mosque is of paramount importance and grandeur, calming down the viewer and making him to admire this magnificent work.”

In addition to tiling and the beautiful cobblestone floor, there are numerous inscriptions of the ayahs of Holy Qoran in this mosque. These inscriptions are examples of calligraphy of Iranian calligraphers. In fact, the collection of all these beauties has attracted the attention of many tourists toward the grandeur of Kaboud Mosque.

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